Please Please Me album artworkWritten by: Lennon-McCartney
Recorded: 11 February 1963
Producer: George Martin
Engineer: Norman Smith

Released: 22 March 1963 (UK), 22 July 1963 (US)

John Lennon: vocals, rhythm guitar, harmonica
Paul McCartney: vocals, bass
George Harrison: backing vocals, lead guitar
Ringo Starr: drums

Available on:
Please Please Me
On Air - Live At The BBC Volume 2

The first song to be recorded at the 11 February 1963 session for the Please Please Me album, There's A Place was completed in 10 takes, apart from a harmonica overdub later that afternoon.

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There's A Place was my attempt at a sort of Motown, black thing. It says the usual Lennon things: 'In my mind there's no sorrow…' It's all in your mind.
John Lennon
All We Are Saying, David Sheff

The song was co-written by Lennon and McCartney in the latter's home at 20 Forthlin Road, Liverpool. It was based loosely upon the song Somewhere from the West Side Story soundtrack album, a copy of which McCartney owned.

In our case the place was in the mind, rather than round the back of the stairs for a kiss and a cuddle. This was the difference with what we were writing: we were getting a bit more cerebral. We both sang it. I took the high harmony, John took the lower harmony or melody. This was a nice thing because we didn't actually have to decide where the melody was till later when they boringly had to write it down for sheet music.
Paul McCartney
Many Years from Now, Barry Miles

There's A Place encapsulates the drive and hunger of The Beatles in 1963. The song is full of the energy familiar to those who saw them live in Liverpool or Hamburg, and a sense of urgency and desire for success pervades the recording.

In the studio

The song was first recorded with another Lennon-McCartney composition - I Saw Her Standing There - on 11 February 1963, during the 10am-1pm morning session for Please Please Me. Recording took place in Studio Two at EMI Studios in Abbey Road, London.

The song was mostly completed in 10 takes. In the afternoon session, from 2.30-6pm, John Lennon overdubbed a harmonica part onto take 10. This addition was recorded in three attempts, with the final version becoming known as take 13.