Brung To Ewe By

While working on Ram, the McCartneys recorded 15 versions of a radio jingle, ‘Now Hear This Song Of Mine’, which also featured the sound of sheep bleating. Twelve of the recordings lasted for 30 seconds, and three for a full minute.

With hundreds of radio stations broadcasting across America, it would have been impossible for the couple to visit enough to create a substantial promotional campaign. As a result, MPL’s New York office released the jingles as a one-sided 12″ record, titled Brung To Ewe By, which had the catalogue number Apple SPRO-6210.

One thousand copies of Brung To Ewe By were pressed. It was issued either in the conventional Ram cover or in a plain white sleeve, and was accompanied by two letters: one by the production company, and another from Paul and Linda explaining the purpose of the disc.

Dear DJ, here are some introductions you might like to use before Ram album tracks. We made them while we were doing Ram and they’re designed to play straight into an album track, or out of it for that matter. Anyway, if you’d enjoy using them, we’d enjoy having you. Ram On!

Thrillington

From June 15-17 1971, Paul McCartney re-recorded Ram in its entirety at EMI Studios, Abbey Road. It was an instrumental arrangement with a full orchestra conducted by Richard Hewson.

The resulting album remained unreleased until 1977 when it was issued as Thrillington, under the pseudonym Percy ‘Thrills’ Thrillington. McCartney wrote sleeve notes under the name Clint Harrigan – whose name also appeared on the first Wings album, and a press release was issued to accompany Thrillington:

Percy ‘Thrills’ Thrillington was born in Coventry Cathedral in England in 1939. As a young man he wandered the globe. His travels took him to Baton Rouge, Louisiana in the US where he studied music for five years. He later moved to LA where he gained expertise in conducting and arranging as well as the marketing end of the music business. Eventually his path led to London where his lifelong ambition to form an orchestra was finally realized… he takes all the songs from Paul and Linda McCartney’s Ram album and, with the help of some of London’s best orchestra and ‘big band’ musicians, forges the pop music themes into new orchestral versions. He is assisted by Richard Newson [sic] who arranged and conducted. When McCartney heard what ‘Thrills’ was doing he even gave the project his seal of approval.

EMI also advertised the album, with a campaign involving radio commercials, business cards for the fictitious Percy Thrillington, thought-bubble stickers, and publicity photographs.

So we invented it all, Linda and I, and we went around southern Ireland and found a guy in a field, a young farmer, and asked if he minded doing some photographic modelling for us. We wanted to find someone that no one could possibly trace, paid him the going rate, and photographed him in a field, wearing a sweater and then wearing an evening suit. But he never quite looked Percy Thrillington enough.
Paul McCartney

Due to the commercial failure of Thrillington it became a collector’s item for a time, although for more than a decade nobody was quite sure whether or not it was by Paul McCartney.

McCartney never volunteered the truth at the time, but was asked about it by journalist Peter Palmiere at a Los Angeles press conference on 27 November 1989.

What a great question to end the conference. The world needs to know! But seriously it was me and Linda – and we kept it a secret for a long time but now the world knows! – you blew it!
Paul McCartney