With The Beatles album artworkWritten by: Lennon-McCartney
Recorded: 11 February, 12 September 1963
Producer: George Martin
Engineer: Norman Smith

Released: 22 November 1963 (UK), 10 April 1964 (US)

Paul McCartney: vocals, bass, handclaps
John Lennon: backing vocals, rhythm guitar, handclaps
George Harrison: backing vocals, lead guitar, handclaps
Ringo Starr: drums, handclaps

Available on:
With The Beatles

Although released on their second album With The Beatles, Hold Me Tight was originally attempted by The Beatles during the mammoth 11 February 1963 session that yielded the bulk of songs for Please Please Me.

Hold Me Tight - With The Beatles
That was Paul's. Maybe I stuck some bits in there - I don't remember. It was a pretty poor song and I was never really interested in it either way.
John Lennon, 1980
All We Are Saying, David Sheff

Hold Me Tight was an early Lennon-McCartney original, written at the latter's home in Forthlin Road, Liverpool, and featured in The Beatles' live set from 1961 to 1963.

When we first started it was all singles and we were always trying to write singles, That's why you get lots of these two minute 30 second songs; they all came out the same length. Hold Me Tight was a failed attempt at a single which then became an acceptable album filler.
Paul McCartney
Many Years From Now, Barry Miles

In the studio

The group recorded 13 takes of the song on 11 February 1963, although when it was deemed surplus to requirements the tape was destroyed. Seven months later they resurrected it for With The Beatles, completing it in nine attempts on 12 September 1963.

The nine takes were numbered 20-29. The album version was an edit of takes 26 and 29; the edit was made by George Martin on 30 September.

I can't remember much about that one. Certain songs were just 'work' songs, you haven't got much memory of them. That's one of them.
Paul McCartney
The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions, Mark Lewisohn

The Beatles evidently didn't rate the song too highly, and the fluffed lyrics, lack of bass in the mix and McCartney's often out-of-tune vocals suggest they didn't take the recording too seriously either.

That was unfortunate, because the recording - which was varispeeded to raise the key from E to F, adding drive and energy - is generally held to be a solid example of an early '60s Beatles rocker, with some clever songwriting features thrown in.