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You Know My Name (Look Up The Number)
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2 January 2022
11.14pm
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Timothy
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From memory, I believe John uses the term slags during his Tom Snyder interview.

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Mr. Moonlight

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2 January 2022
11.41pm
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Richard
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Timothy said
From memory, I believe John uses the term slags during his Tom Snyder interview. 

Yes, he certainly does. Well remembered!

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Timothy, Rube

And in the end

The love you take is equal to the love you make

 

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3 January 2022
8.54pm
forn
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Ron Nasty said
“Slag” is an English slang term for a woman of “loose morals”.

When it’s a man of “loose morals”, he’s a stud and patted on the back as a lucky so-and-so.

The tale of double standards.

Thanks for that.  I’ve been hearing the term “slag” off and on for many years.  But I never knew exactly what it meant.  Kind of makes the song a little funnier. 

And it may be a double standard, but it seems to be a double standard that is applied by both genders, not just the men.  

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6 January 2022
6.05pm
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Mr. Moonlight
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To slag or slag off is also a verb meaning to criticise or insult. In terms of grammar that makes more sense but of course I have no way of knowing what they had in mind and in any case the two meanings are not a million miles apart.

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