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26 February 2018
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Ron Nasty
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This is a find! Filmed at Studio Two on 30 July 1968 by the National Music Council of Great Britain for a film called Music!. The film included 2 minutes 32 seconds of footage from the session, here's a whopping 24 minutes 43 seconds from the session. Interestingly it includes footage of George playing guitar, presumably before Paul banished him to the control room.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?.....IN_83znK9c

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27 February 2018
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meanmistermustard
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It's been doing the rounds on download sites for a while as well. So much stuff is out there that we haven't seen.

I'm sure that the footage that previously circulated from 'Music!' is also a notable upgrade.

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27 February 2018
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Zig
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Ooooh - thanks RN. I haven't seen it yet. Can't wait to dive into that later today. beatlemaniacs_02_gif 

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4 March 2018
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Timothy
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My favourite song from Paul. The extended ending always gives my chills because it’s like a glorious sun setting. It seems to capture what his music is all about - a feeling of joy and celebration. I also dig how it compares to I Want You (She’s So Heavy). Both are long songs that reflect both Paul and John’s personalities. One is bright and optimistic, and the other is darker and obsessive. One song fades out, the other gets louder. 

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12 March 2018
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Ignoring the actual song, David Frost gives them a great build up, pauses for them to begin, only for a deliberately awful blast of 'It's Now Or Never' to follow. 

 

The old guy who was giving it laldy throughout, clearly at the end, is briiliant.

 

Was this when Paul decided they should get back to being around the fans instead of couped up in the studio?

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12 March 2018
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Zig
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meanmistermustard said
 

Was this when Paul decided they should get back to being around the fans instead of couped up in the studio?  

It wouldn't surprise me if that was a catalyst. 

To the fountain of perpetual mirth, let it roll for all its worth. And all the children boogie.

17 March 2018
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Timothy
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Once you hear the ‘f***ing hell’ in this song you never not notice it!

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17 March 2018
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Billy Rhythm
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meanmistermustard said 

The old guy who was giving it laldy throughout, clearly at the end, is briiliant.

There's certainly quite a cast of characters present...  There's such a vibe to that room...  The smiles are abundant with many ear-to-ear grins throughout...  The song has an undeniable uplifting way about it and these videos effectively captured what millions around the world were also experiencing...  I wonder what the story is with some of these lucky souls and how they were so fortunate to have become a part of history here...

meanmistermustard said 

Was this when Paul decided they should get back to being around the fans instead of couped up in the studio?  

Word was that, after the David Frost performances, Paul got hyped for the band to even start touring again which was likely laughed off by the others...  The 'Roundhouse Rehearsals' rumours soon surfaced afterwards and, of course, plans for a live show/album commenced in January 1969...  something that all four appeared to be enthused about at the start...:-)

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29 July 2018
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I apologize if this has been brought up before. I've looked extensively for any proof of this unsuccessfully, but I'm still dubious. The line "so let it out and let it in" is sung over the second verse rather awkardly. It's sung just the way it sounds on the second bridge. Was this an engineering mistake that was kept in? In the David Frost tapings, it is absent from the basic track Paul sang to. Anybody?

-- Okay, since the original post I found out more. After the final vocal track was completed, Paul recorded some overdubs for the sound-enrichening, double-vocal effect that permeates so many Beatles songs. At some point though, the "let it out and let in -- hey, Jude" line was moved by Paul from overdubbing where it belonged back to just after "you have found her, now go and get her." This may or may not have been a happy accident on his part, but it was purposely put into the final cut, and thus wasn't an engineering mistake as I had pondered. Just another bit of lore associated with just one song (!) to go along with Ringo in the bathroom and the f-bomb that The Beatles were sure "nobody would ever notice" -- until digital sound, of course...

29 September 2018
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What Petty Crime
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Fifty years ago this weekend, this classic song knocked "Harper Valley PTA" out of the top spot on the Billboard chart. Even with all the great music out there in the fall of 1968, it would stay perched there for nine weeks. By the time it yielded to The Supremes' "Love Child" on the last day of November, American fans had 30 tracks of White Album to obsess over. (31 if we're counting "Can You Take Me Back?") 

There are good pop songs you gorge on and then get sick of, and maybe after a while you go back to them and they have some nostalgic appeal, but they never have that same shine out of their time. There there are great ones that mean more and more to you; they're evergreens. That's "Hey Jude " to me. I never get tired of it and I would not want to lose a second of it. I was not born in 1968, but it creates a sense of that time for me. It's a product of the summer after the summer of love, that turbulent year of 1968, and it's everything that's great about Paul at his best -- his optimism, his warmth, his feeling for community. The song was born out of generosity, out of fond feeling and concern, and every bar of the performance is generous. It was inspired, of course, by something difficult a 5-year-old child was feeling and going through, not even Paul's own child, and it swelled into an anthem of perseverance.

The long singalong that is more than half the record was just made for concert performances, for audiences to share in. After a long time, its author did get to take it out on the road, alas without his old mates. Now it is a McCartney concert staple.  

It was, according to George Martin, John who said the radio would make an exception (for the song's unprecedented length) because it was them, the Beatles, and John was proved right. Even in the most acerbic interviews John ever gave, he always gave Paul his due for this one. There was the time he was grousing about "Revolution " not being an A-side, and he said they had put out "Hello Goodbye or some shit," and then he caught himself and said, no, they had put out "Hey Jude "...and that "Hey Jude " was worth it. And the other time he said it was a great set of lyrics he had had absolutely nothing to do with. But he was not quite right on that point. He encouraged Paul to keep the rough-draft line "The movement you need is on your shoulder," and now Paul says he thinks of John every time he sings it.  

A great song, a great recording, and right up there with "Yesterday " among the ones Paul will be remembered forever for. But this, rather than "Yesterday ," might be the one I'd play for a visiting alien to demonstrate how great he can be. It makes the personal universal...something he's still been able to do as recently as (the song) "New."  

I know this has come off "Paul Paul Paul," and I don't mean to slight anyone else's contribution. it's a great group performance. But this particular song, I think of as his baby above all.  

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29 September 2018
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What Petty Crime said
Fifty years ago this weekend, this classic song knocked "Harper Valley, PTA" out of the top spot on the Billboard chart. Even with all the great music out there in the fall of 1968, it would stay perched there for nine weeks. By the time it yielded to The Supremes' "Love Child" on the last day of November, American fans had 30 tracks of White Album to obsess over. (31 if we're counting "Can You Take Me Back?") 

There are good pop songs you gorge on and then get sick of, and maybe after a while you go back to them and they have some nostalgic appeal, but they never have that same shine out of their time. There there are great ones that mean more and more to you; they're evergreens. That's "Hey Jude " to me. I never get tired of it and I would not want to lose a second of it. I was not born in 1968, but it creates a sense of that time for me. It's a product of the summer after the summer of love, that turbulent year of 1968, and it's everything that's great about Paul at his best -- his optimism, his warmth, his feeling for community. The song was born out of generosity, out of fond feeling and concern, and every bar of the performance is generous. It was inspired, of course, by something difficult a 5-year-old child was feeling and going through, not even Paul's own child, and it swelled into an anthem of perseverance.

The long singalong that is more than half the record was just made for concert performances, for audiences to share in. After a long time, its author did get to take it out on the road, alas without his old mates. Now it is a McCartney concert staple.  

It was, according to George Martin, John who said the radio would make an exception (for the song's unprecedented length) because it was them, the Beatles, and John was proved right. Even in the most acerbic interviews John ever gave, he always gave Paul his due for this one. There was the time he was grousing about "Revolution " not being an A-side, and he said they had put out "Hello Goodbye or some shit," and then he caught himself and said, no, they had put out "Hey Jude "...and that "Hey Jude " was worth it. And the other time he said it was a great set of lyrics he had had absolutely nothing to do with. But he was not quite right on that point. He encouraged Paul to keep the rough-draft line "The movement you need is on your shoulder," and now Paul says he thinks of John every time sings it.  

A great song, a great recording, and right up there with "Yesterday " among the ones Paul will be remembered forever for. But this, rather than "Yesterday ," might be the one I'd play for a visiting alien to demonstrate how great he can be. It makes the personal universal...something he's still been able to do as recently as (the song) "New."  

I know this has come off "Paul Paul Paul," and I don't mean to slight anyone else's contribution. it's a great group performance. But this particular song, I think of as his baby above all.    

Very moving. Na, na na, NA-NA-NA-NA forever!

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29 September 2018
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meanmistermustard said
Ignoring the actual song, David Frost gives them a great build up, pauses for them to begin, only for a deliberately awful blast of 'It's Now Or Never' to follow. 

 

The old guy who was giving it laldy throughout, clearly at the end, is briiliant.

 

Was this when Paul decided they should get back to being around the fans instead of couped up in the studio?  

The man at 6:53 looks an awful lot like our George. Anyone know who he was?

“While I will admit to a certain cynicism, the fact is that I’m a naysayer and hatchet man in the fight against violence. I pride myself in taking a punch and I’ll gladly take another - because I choose to live my life in the company of Ghandi and King. My concerns are global. I reject absolutely revenge, aggression and retaliation. The foundation of such a method is love. I love you, Sheriff Truman.”

 

1 October 2018
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There was an arcticle about Hey Jude published on The Guardian towards  the end of August.

https://www.theguardian.com/mu.....atles-song

1 October 2018
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^ Nice article. I love this bit:

At Westminster School, at which fees cost more than £23,000 a year, the boys and girls went into Latin prayers one day in 2012 and pulled a stunt planned on Facebook, singing Hey Jude as the organist launched into Deus Misereatur. Contacted by the London Evening Standard, the headteacher kept his cool. “Their Hey Jude stopped after the first verse because I don’t think they knew any more of the words,” Stephen Spurr said. “I felt tempted to sing them.”

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29 August 2020
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sir walter raleigh
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I know i’ve heard it a million different times but this song is really resonating with me right now. 

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30 August 2020
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I never ever get sick of the extended outro.

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30 August 2020
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A long time since I've seen that clip which was I believe used as the official video, but can't remember seeing the introduction and tomfoolery before. How effortlessly cool do they all look, even with Ringo and George seemingly wearing matching ruffed shirts in different colours? Amazed that that version hasn't appeared on an official CD, would have fit on Anthology 3 perfectly. Do you think that was all live, or just vocals over a different but pre-recorded backing track al la Top of the Pops? 

30 August 2020
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Filmed on 4 September 1968, @Old Soak, the "introduction and tomfoolery before" were done as a prelude for the song's unveiling on The David Frost Show four days later on 8 September, to give the impression they were appearing live on the show rather than it being a prerecorded insert. It was live vocals over the studio backing track, with Paul singing along to his studio vocal for the main body of the song, and ad-libbing his vocals for the "Na-na-na, na-na-na..." section, and an edit of two different performances of the three filmed.

The performance was, as you remember, used as the official promotional film minus the David Frost section.

The Revolution  promotional film was made on the same day.

Interestingly, they were directed by Michael Lindsay-Hogg and filmed at Twickenham Film Studios. Paul enjoying the interaction with the audience element of the Hey Jude  performance was one of the inspirations for the Get Back /Let It Be  sessions, which would see them and Michael Lindsay-Hogg reassemble at Twickenham on 2 January 1969.

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5 September 2020
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meanmistermustard said

The old guy who was giving it laldy throughout, clearly at the end, is briiliant.

  

The guy in the suspenders with the tea cup, behind Paul, is pretty funny.

Great song.  The only reason it suffers at all IMO is because it's been so widely played.  I don't want to say "overplayed" because songs that get played that much generally deserve it.  It's like the reason Stairway to Heaven suffers is because you've heard it so many times.

8 September 2020
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forn said

meanmistermustard said

The old guy who was giving it laldy throughout, clearly at the end, is briiliant.

  

The guy in the suspenders with the tea cup, behind Paul, is pretty funny.

Great song.  The only reason it suffers at all IMO is because it's been so widely played.  I don't want to say "overplayed" because songs that get played that much generally deserve it.  It's like the reason Stairway to Heaven suffers is because you've heard it so many times.

  

I have avoided certain songs for that reason in the past. But even after a good solid rest the familiarity is still so strong. It's something that can't be reduced. Therefore if I feel like listening to something now I just do it.  

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