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Strongest Beatle per album
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30 January 2014
11.56pm
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Necko
Earth
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Paul during White Album era, for sure...

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I'm Necko.  I'm like Ringo except I wear necklaces.

I'm also ewe2 on weekends.

31 January 2014
1.02am
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TheOneBeatleManiac
Here, There And Everywhere
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Necko said

Paul during White Album era, for sure...

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a-hard-days-night-ringo-8 LOL.
a-hard-days-night-john-6a-hard-days-night-paul-8a-hard-days-night-george-9a-hard-days-night-ringo-10brian-epstein

Let me take you down 'cause I'm going to...Strawberry Fields.

9 February 2014
5.07pm
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xskelterhelterx
Nova Scotia
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RS- John

Revolver- Paul/John- John contributed IOS, SSSS, TNK.  Paul- ER, HTAE, etc.

Pepper- Paul.  John had some really good songs on this though.

WA- John/Paul.  I'd give the slight edge to John I guess.

Abbey Road- Paul.  George was close.  But Paul took over after Epstein died.

9 February 2014
9.35pm
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InTheEnd
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Please Please Me: Paul, but only just.  If John didn't have that nasty cold he would have taken it.

With The Beatles: John

A Hard Day's Night: John, but again this is close.  All of Paul's songs on this album are classics.

Beatles For Sale: John, again only just.  "I Don't Want To Spoil The Party" is one of his best songs and certainly one of their most underrated.

Help!: John, though this might be the closest between John and Paul

Rubber Soul: Paul, although "In My Life" almost wins it for John here.  I've always thought "Girl" was a tad overrated (Sorry!) and I've never cared for "Run For Your Life"

Revolver: Paul's talent explodes on this record.  John's songs are all great but the psychedelic rockers start to sound a tad too similar after a while.  Every one of Paul's contributions are absolutely incredible.  George also really shines on this record.  What an album.

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band: Paul wins this one going away, although I do love "Within You Without You".

Magical Mystery Tour (Capitol version): The EP songs are good but I wouldn't consider any of them classics, so John edges out Paul thanks to "All You Need Is Love"

The Beatles: I love this album so this is the most difficult for me.  Really, really close between John, Paul and George, but I have to give it to John.  George contributes two of his all-time best songs (I said in another thread that "Long, Long, Long" is my absolute favorite song and I realize I'm in the minority on that!) but all of John's except for "Bungalow Bill" and "Yer Blues" are absolute top notch.  "Happiness Is A Warm Gun" might be my favorite Lennon song.

Yellow Submarine: George edges out John simply because of George's two songs to John's one (counting only previously unreleased songs).  I get the feeling that George's two other 1967 contributions are either loved or hated by the fans, but I love them both.

Let It Be: Paul was the only one interested in this project and it shows.

Abbey Road: George.  Paul has the medley(most of it, anyway) and John's songs are great, but George's two songs here might be the best two he ever wrote.  Ringo steps up with one of his best, too.  A wonderful end to the best band ever.

How could I ever have lost you when I loved you?

9 February 2014
9.39pm
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IveJustSeenAFaceo
Arrived Somewhere (But Not Here)
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TheOneBeatleManiac said
(SNIP
With The Beatles: John again (though Paul has All My Loving & Till There Was You here, and those are classics).

A Hard Day's Night: Obviously John (probably the album with more John than anybody, though Paul is not behind with all his three leads - All My Loving, Can't Buy Me Love, Things We Said Today).
(SNIP)

You appear to have listed this twice. Once correctly, once incorrectly. Just letting you know.

(This signature brought to you by Spaghetti Tuesdays. Occurring on Wednesdays since 2013.)

26 February 2014
5.49pm
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DayInTheLife
Strawberry Fields
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This is quite tough but I guess this is it:

Please Please Me - John

WTB - John (but All My Loving rules)

AHDN - John (but Things We Said Today and And I Love Her are two of my fav songs)

BFS - John (I'm A Loser is just awesome!)

Help - John (Paul comes closer with Yerterday and I've Just Seen A Face)

Rubber Soul - John's songs in this album are some of the best songs that he ever wrote (In My Life and Nowhere Man are brilliant!)

Revolver - Paul (Eleanor Rigby is amazing and Here, There And Everywhere is such a touching and charming song) but Tomorrow Never Knows is the best song of the album for me.

Sgt. Peppers - Paul no doubt.

MMT - Tie between John and Paul.

White - John and George have the best songs in general. (McCa is kind of "meh" with songs like Martha or I Will)

YS- George.

Let It Be - Paul.

Abbey Road - Paul (the medley man! just frekin' awesome!) but George songs are classics!

"If there's a thing such as genius. I am one. And if there isn't, I don't care." - John Lennon

 

27 February 2014
3.49pm
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MoonDogVic
Miami, FL US
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Please Please Me - John (Please Please Me)

With The Beatles - John (It Won't Be Long)

Hard Day's Night - John (Hard Day's Night)

Beatles For Sale - John (No Reply)

Help - John (Help)

Rubber Soul - Paul (Baby You Can Drive My Car)

Revolver - Paul (Eleanor Rigby)

Sgt. Pepper's - John (A Day In The Life) **

Magical Mystery Tour - John (Strawberry Fields)

White Album - John (Dear Prudence)

Yellow Submarine - John (All Your Need if Love)

Abbey Road - George (Something)

Let it Be - Paul (Long and Winding Road)

( ) = Standout Tracks

** Best Album

 

 

Cavernite

28 February 2014
6.17am
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PeterWeatherby
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It's quite characteristic of the "John" personality type to go full-on guns blazing into some new venture, only to lose interest after a while and become quite apathetic. John did this at almost every turn in his life - he was besotted with Cynthia (as his letters from Hamburg show) but eventually lost interest, and then Yoko suddenly became the answer to everything; he thought the Maharishi could slip him "the answer," and then just as quickly turned venomous towards the guru; he was prepared to promote Primal Scream to the ends of the earth when he first discovered it, then grew tired of it.

So also, I think, with The Beatles. It's everything he ever wanted, at first, and he went after it 100%. Then he got bored, and restless, and by the end he wanted "a divorce." I think his contributions to each album tell that story in spades.

On Please Please Me, he was a dominant force. Hell, he single-handedly wrote the chart-topping single of the same name that put The Beatles on the map. Paul's major contribution was "I Saw Her Standing There," which is nothing to sneeze at, but if we're pitting songs like "There's A Place" or "Ask Me Why" against something like "P.S. I Love You," John wins this contest handily.

I'd give With the Beatles to John as well. He and Paul went pretty well tit-for-tat in terms of original material (I'll see your "All My Loving" and raise you a "It Won't Be Long"), but there's just so much John energy on this album - the emotion he invests in "Postman" or "You Really Got A Hold On Me."

With A Hard Day's Night, I think John hit his productive peak. It's not even close - something like ten songs, to McCartney's three? After this, I think John starts getting tired of the whole thing, and gradually begins to drop off.

They were all so busy that practically no one had time to write original material for Beatles For Sale, and the stuff they did write is, in my book, pretty much a wash. Either John and Paul wrote stuff together (like "Eight Days A Week"), or their individual contributions aren't really all that strong (e.g., "What You're Doing" and "Baby's In Black").

As they moved into Help!, I think John started getting more selective. He was less concerned about cranking out another hit song, and more interested in writing about his own life, experiences, feelings, etc. This is where I think John's stuff becomes far more personal (and therefore polarizing), and Paul starts to crank out the commercial polish. With songs like "I've Just Seen A Face" and "Yesterday," Paul starts to step into the hit-maker role a bit more, even if John's "Help!" and "You've Got To Hide Your Love Away" are solid to the core.

Rubber Soul is also something of a wash. John nailed it with stuff like "Nowhere Man" and "Girl," but Paul was keeping pace nicely with things like "You Won't See Me," "Drive My Car," and "I'm Looking Through You." John continues moving inward, Paul continues shining up the marquee.

Revolver is where John really starts to lose a few steps. I think this is where his boredom with the Beatles really starts to show up. He's writing songs about being lazy, or songs that he would later call "a throwaway" (like "And Your Bird Can Sing"). He throws some real effort into "Tomorrow Never Knows," but again, it's because he'd found something interesting that got him excited. Otherwise, his contributions continued to be very selective, while Paul flexed his musical muscles and knocked out some major hits in several different musical genres - "Eleanor Rigby," "Got To Get You Into My Life," "Yellow Submarine," "Here, There, and Everywhere," and "Good Day Sunshine" all go to very different places musically, but they're all breathtaking.

We all know Sgt. Pepper was Paul's baby, start to finish. John more-or-less phones it in for most of this album - I enjoy "Mr. Kite" as much as anyone, but let's face it, he wrote it straight off a circus poster. He was starting to lose more and more time on endless drug trips, sleeping in, and lounging around the house. "Good Morning" came from a television commercial. He seems to have found some inspiration in "Lucy," but that's about as far as he got. Yes, "Day in the Life" is amazing, but that's also a Len-Mac collaboration, so you can't really credit that one to either of them.

After that, John and Paul's paths grow increasingly further apart. Magical Mystery Tour, The White Album, and so on, are indicators of what their future solo careers will look like. John will write songs that mean something to him, his output will lag behind Paul's, and the results will be mixed, because songs that are personally interesting can be very polarizing. Paul will increase his output, and as a result he will write an incredible number of fantastic stinkers, as well as an unbelievable number of hits. To this day, I will listen to songs like "How?", "Watching The Wheels," or "Crippled Inside," and think that Paul never came close to that level of insight; and at the same time, when I listen to a greatest hits collection, I end up skipping far more of John's songs than I do Paul's.

So I think they split the results. John was stronger at the start, and gradually backed away out of lack of interest while Paul moved to the forefront. One thing is certain, though: George wins Abbey Road, hands down.

Not a bit like Cagney.

28 February 2014
2.15pm
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fabfouremily
Sitting in an English garden
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Brilliant post! You've made me think properly about the point you've raised - that John's gradual disinterest is reflected in his work. I've never really thought much about that before.
One thing though, I don't see the problem with where John got his inspiration from to write For The Benefit.... It's a good song. He was inspired to write A Day In The Life from a paper, and yet few would call this anything but a masterpiece. So I don't think that really says anything at all about his losing interest in writing, and therefore his quality and quantity of songs for the group.

Moving along in our God given ways, safety is sat by the fire/Sanctuary from these feverish smiles, left with a mark on the door.

(Passover - I. Curtis)

28 February 2014
2.39pm
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PeterWeatherby
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fabfouremily said

One thing though, I don't see the problem with where John got his inspiration from to write For The Benefit.... It's a good song.

Sure, it's a good song, and that's a testament to John's talent as a musician. I just meant that it strikes me as something of a half-assed effort in terms of songwriting, you know, he needed to contribute some music for this project that Paul was all fired up about, so ... "Here, I have a poster, I'll just take a bunch of lines straight from there."

If I remember the story correctly, he couldn't even be troubled to get off the couch, so he squinted at the poster across the room and tried to copy what words he could see. :)

Not a bit like Cagney.

7 March 2014
5.02am
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Into the Sky with Diamonds
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@PeterWeatherby 

Great analysis! (Love "I'll see your "All My Loving" and raise you a "It Won't Be Long").

I see where you're coming from, but I don't think it's that straightforward. Yes, by all accounts Lennon had a tendency to get wound up about something and then drop it. Yet, I don't think you can put the Beatles in that category. He'd been in the band 10 years or so before he decided to go in another direction and had achieved all the fame he could have ever imagined. So the Beatles were hardly a passing fancy. As he would say himself, Lennon was naturally lazy, and once he achieved fame, his laziness got the better of him (as did the drugs). So yes, by the time Pepper came around he was too drugged or too lazy to expend huge amounts of time to the band (or his wife or his son). Copying lyrics point blank from a poster fit right in. And what about the lyrics to "Good Morning, Good Morning" ("I've got nothing to say…")? Seems to me he was bored with life in general, no more so the Beatles than anything else.

But yes, I agree that Lennon in some ways was running out of steam after Rubber Soul, though ironically many of his greatest songs were written after that album. I attribute that happy circumstance to the artistically fruitful combination of compositional genius, drugs, terrific band mates + a terrific producer.

 

"Into the Sky with Diamonds" (the Beatles and the Race to the Moon – a history)

7 March 2014
7.17am
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TheOneBeatleManiac
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IveJustSeenAFaceo said

A Hard Day's Night: Obviously John (probably the album with more John than anybody, though Paul is not behind with all his three leads - All My Loving, Can't Buy Me Love, Things We Said Today).
(SNIP)

You appear to have listed this twice. Once correctly, once incorrectly. Just letting you know.

Yeah, thanks for notifying me. I meant to wrote And I Love Her, but I think I was still thinking in With The Beatles when writing.

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IveJustSeenAFaceo

Let me take you down 'cause I'm going to...Strawberry Fields.

7 March 2014
12.52pm
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OneCoolCat
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Please Please Me: Paul 
With The Beatles: John
A Hard Day's Night: John
Beatles For Sale: John
Help: John
Rubber Soul: Paul
Revolver: Paul
Sgt. Pepper's: Paul
Magical Mystery Tour: Paul
The Beatles: John
Yellow Submarine: George
Abbey Road: Paul
Let It Be: Paul

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 March 2014
5.42pm
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PeterWeatherby
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Into the Sky with Diamonds said

I see where you're coming from, but I don't think it's that straightforward. Yes, by all accounts Lennon had a tendency to get wound up about something and then drop it. Yet, I don't think you can put the Beatles in that category. He'd been in the band 10 years or so before he decided to go in another direction and had achieved all the fame he could have ever imagined. So the Beatles were hardly a passing fancy.

Well, but ultimately The Beatles were a "passing fancy" to John - maybe they didn't come and go overnight like a flash in the pan, but ultimately they did go from being John's #1 obsession to being the one thing he wanted to get away from.

I wouldn't say it took 10 years for him to get bored of the whole thing. It just took him that long to find something else that really excited him (Yoko, in this case) and gave him a reason to make a definitive break. The "lazy" factor is an indicator here. The "John" personality isn't necessarily inherently lazy, but they tend to be incredibly lazy when they're not on fire for some new venture. When John was "on fire" for The Beatles, he was anything but lazy, and he broke his back working to get the group into the international spotlight. Heck, even when it was just The Quarrymen, he was highly motivated and worked very hard for a long time to get to that next level.

He recaptured some of the fire when he met Yoko and was suddenly all about new artistic projects and promoting peace.

But anyway, the point is, John's tend to get lazy when they get bored and no longer believe in the importance of the work they're doing, so when I see that John was starting to do a lot more lounging around the house during the Pepper project, for me that's an indicator that he was getting quite bored with The Beatle project. Understandably so, too, because he'd accomplished what he wanted to accomplish: unheard-of fame and fortune. And it still didn't make him happy, so, "on to the next thing."

Here's an interesting theory/speculation to mull over: if there hadn't been a "Paul" personality type in the group - the ever-driven, ever-motivated, loves-to-work-his-butt-off type - would The Beatles have even recorded another album after Brian Epstein died? I tend to doubt it. But that's another discussion, I suppose.

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Not a bit like Cagney.

20 March 2014
3.57am
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Zig
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PeterWeatherby said
It's quite characteristic of the "John" personality type to go full-on guns blazing into some new venture, only to lose interest after a while and become quite apathetic. 

I love reading well written posts. You obviously put a lot of thought into it and you had me on most points, but not about him being apathetic. I may be wrong, but I think his attentions simply went elsewhere - as you said, on to the next thing. To be fair, there are many accounts of him saying he was lazy, tired, always sleeping, etc... Some of it was the sheer boredom of living so far away from the action of London, some of it was from the drugs from late '64 forward, some of it was a combination of both. In the past, I was also convinced he had gotten increasingly lazy - I've even posted that in these very pages. But the more I thought about it... Consider where his energy was directed at different stages.

In the early days, his energy was spent largely trying to write hit pop singles. George Martin has said that even at the point of the second album, they were still thinking in terms of singles - filling an album with pop songs. But, as he mastered this (I agree that A Hard Day's Night was his peak for '63/'64) he got bored. Instead of apathetic, however, I feel he just turned his energy toward writing more meaningful songs. To me, Beatles For Sale is such a fascinating album. Part of it feels like the rush job that it was and the other part shows flashes of John dabbling in the personal ('I'm A Loser' and to a degree, 'I Don't Want To Spoil The Party'. An energy shift, if you will indulge me.

As for '65, I feel he started caring less about quantity and stared to dwell more on quality. The quality I speak of is in terms of meaning - songs that say something besides, "please buy this record". HELP! and Rubber Soul feature Lennon songs that both rock and say something at the same time. 'HELP!', 'Ticket To Ride' and 'The Word' leap to mind. Other songs were deeper, more meaningful - 'You've Got To Hide Your Love Away', 'In My Life' etc...

Now 66 - 68.

PeterWeatherby said

Revolver is where John really starts to lose a few steps. I think this is where his boredom with the Beatles really starts to show up. He's writing songs about being lazy, or songs that he would later call "a throwaway" (like "And Your Bird Can Sing"). 

... Sgt. Pepper ... John more-or-less phones it in for most of this album - I enjoy "Mr. Kite" as much as anyone, but let's face it, he wrote it straight off a circus poster. He was starting to lose more and more time on endless drug trips, sleeping in, and lounging around the house. 

One man's apathy is another man's energy shift. OK, so how energetic can you be when you spend a good deal of time in a drug-induced haze? So let's get off the word energy and replace it with focus. Having evolved well past pop writing, his focus seemed to be less on the words and more about sound. While his written words may have "lost a step" in some cases, the sounds he wanted to create leaped ahead. From Revolver forward are some of my absolute favorite John songs. They were not always the most brilliant lyrically but oh-my-friggin'-word, the songs sounded so cool and/or beautiful. You felt something when you heard them. He wanted people to feel as though they were hearing a Tibetan Monk in 'Tomorrow Never Knows'. 'Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite' was absolutely nicked from a poster. That can be seen by some as lazy/apathetic. But consider this. He just did not care about the words, he wanted to create a feeling. Most of us know the story of how he told George Martin that he wanted to "smell the sawdust" from the circus (paraphrasing) when he heard the song. Who else in 1967 was thinking that way? 'Good Morning, Good Morning' was taken from a TV commercial? You betcha...for about 7 seconds at the beginning and a couple more few-second intervals in between. The rest of the song flows so melodically and tells a story that no cereal maker in their right mind would want associated with their product - would you want your kids thinking about "watching the skirts" while eating their Corn Flakes? I just don't buy into that jazz about how "he stole that song from a commercial". Two of his most iconic songs are 'Strawberry Fields Forever' and 'I Am The Walrus'. Forgive my memory as to which one, but wasn't he very disappointed with one of them because it did not sound the way he heard it in his head? Seriously? That sounds to me like a man who knew what he wanted. The Beatles features songs that tell stories from the trip to India (Dear Prudence, Sexy Sadie, etc...). Just ordinary, dull stories set to some pretty damn cool music. They could have been stories about someone clipping their toenails on the banks of the Ganges and he would have made it sound beautiful. 

(sung to the tune of Sexy Sadie)

Clipped my toenail - where did it Go?

I've seemed to lost it in the sun.

I've seemed to lost it in the suuuuuuuuuu-uuuuuuuuuun

Clipped my toenail - oh where did it go?

After that, the boredom/stifling/whatever-you-want-to-call-it got to the point where he wanted less and less to do with the band and more and more to do with other things - the next things. Wanting to move on is not apathy in my book. 

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Silly Girl

To the fountain of perpetual mirth, Let it roll for all its worth.

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20 March 2014
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WhereArtEsteban
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^^^Wasn't the one he thought he messed up "Tomorrow Never Knows"? He said he wanted the chanting

John wins em all in my book save for a tie on Rubber Soul with Paul, Paul wins SPLHCB, George gets YS for "Its All Too Much" being incredible. Let It Be is a tie of all of them
I say Ringo wins Abbey Road for singing the chorus in "Carry That Weight"a-hard-days-night-ringo-15

"P. P. P. P. S- L. P. Winner."

20 March 2014
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xskelterhelterx
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Paul is my favorite Beatle.   But Lennon was easily the best on Rubber Soul

 

Norwegian Wood, In My Life, Nowhere Man, Girl, etc

 

8 September 2016
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Please Please Me: John (Number One)- Vocal performance for-"Twist And Shout", "Anna (Go to Him)", "Baby It's You", Writing-"Please Please Me", "Do You Want To Know A Secret" (Sung by George), Paul (close second)- is a close second with writing of "I Saw Her Standing There", "Love Me Do", and "P.S. I Love You, and good vocal performance on "A Taste Of Honey", and a great collaboration on "There's a Place" and "Misery". George's vocal performance is just okay on ''Chains", Ringo does a good vocal job on "Boys", and John's "Ask Me Why" is a weak song. John and Paul's accompanying single "Thank You Girl" and "From Me To You" would have made the album even stronger.

With The Beatles: John (Number One)- First of all this album never gets the respect it deserves. 4 great songs from this period should have been on this album but were left off as singles. "She Loves You" , "I'll Get You", "I Want To Hold Your Hand", and "This Boy" are all strong songs with "I'll Get You" Being the weakest, but the first three were collaboration between Lennon and McCartney were both Lennon and McCartney's voices really stand out, and "This Boy" was one of John's strongest vocal performances. Now for the album- John penned "It Won't Be Long", "All I've Got To Do" are solid, "Not A Second Time" is not bad, and Lennon vocals are brilliant on his covers of "Money (That's What I Want", "You Really Got A Hold On Me" and "Please Mister Postman". His weakest moment is with "Little Child", but I do like the energy and harmonica solo on the track. Paul (number 2) pens maybe the best song on the album with "All My Loving", but "Hold Me Tight" is one of his worst tracks. Paul's vocal performance on "Til There Was You" is flawless. George (3rd) pens his first song "Don't Bother Me" sounds amateurish, but George makes up for by giving to fine vocal and guitar performances on "Devil In Her Heart" and "Roll Over Beethoven". Ringo sings "I Wanna Be Your Man" very well, and is a great rocker penned by Lennon/McCartney.

A Hard Day's Night: John-(Number One) One of John's strongest albums- The Album  opens up with three very strong Lennon tracks in "A Hard Days Night", "I should Have Known Better", "If I Fell", and Side two closes with two more great Lennon track in "You Can't Do That" and I'll Be Back".  "Any Time At All" is a great rocker, Great vocal on "When I Get Home", and I'll Cry Instead" is a bit of preview of what's to come with the tone of BFS, and "Tell me Why" can be little bit overbearing with the vocals at times but still a fun track. Lennon also penned George's only vocal performance on "I am Happy To Dance With You" is another fun tune. Paul's productivity is 2nd on this album, but his three contributions are very strong in "Can't Buy Me Love" and "I Love Her", and “Things We Said Today”. The Long Tall Sally EP was also recorded about the same time as AHDN and includes Paul’s ripping performance on “Long Tall Sally”, John’s great vocal performance on “Slow Down”, and Ringo gives on of his best performances on “Matchbox”. John’s “I’ll Call Your Name” could have easily made it on to AHDN as well.

Beatles For Sale: John (Number One)-John's stuff is very strong on this album and saves this album from being a total disaster. The album opens with some of John's greatest tunes from the early Beatle period. "No Reply" is a great pop tune for 1964 and "I'm A Loser" and "I Don't Want To Spoil The Party" are very strong and personal Lennon tracks. "Baby's In Black" is also very strong but was a collaboration with Paul. "Eight Day's a Week" is mostly Paul's, but John deliverers a scorching vocal track and the energy on the track makes it one my favorites. Paul's stuff falls a little short for me on this album.  I love his collaborations with John on "Eight Days A Week" and "Baby's In Black" but "I'll Follow The Sun", "Every Little Thing", "What Your Doing" underdeveloped and  somewhat tired. The covers on this album also fall a little short. This is the first album where the Beatles did not improve upon the original version of the songs that they were covering.  Lennon's performance on "Rock N Roll Music" comes close to the original, but seems a bit lacking. McCartney's performance on "Kansas City" is the same way. "Mr. Moonlight" is very  strange selection but get points for being interesting. The rest of the covers could have been left off. "Word of Love" put me to sleep and George's voice is not suited for Carl Perkins on "Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby", and Ringo sounds flat on "Honey Don't". This album desperately needed the  accompanying single to give it more strength.  Lennon's "I Feel Fine", and Paul's "She's a Women" were both solid tracks.  Although I always thought that "I Feel Fine" is a bit overrated and not as strong a "No Reply", "I'm A Loser" or I Don't Want To Spoil The Party". If the Beatles could have only waited to release the best of BFS and combined the tunes with the best of Help than they would have had a real gem.

Help: (John and Paul are tied)-Lennon Penned some of the strongest tunes on the album including-"Help", "Ticket To Ride", "You're Going To Lose That Girl", and "You've Got To Hide Your Love Away". "You're Going To Lose That Girl" is often overlooked and is really a great, high energy song. I have always liked as much as "Ticket To Ride" and "Help".  "You've Got To Hide Your Love Away" sound like John doing Dylan and always falls a little short for me. "It's Only Love" sound a bit trite. Paul's stuff is finally there in quality and quantity. "Yesterday" is probably one of the greatest songs ever written and is clearly the best on the album even though it sounds a bit out of place. "Yesterday" is a sneak preview of what Paul will accomplish on Revolver. "I've Just Seen A Face" is such a short and simple song, but the tune never gets old for me.  I just love it! "Another Girl",  "The Night Before" and "Tell Me What You See" are cut from the same cloth as "What Your Doing" on BFS, but have actually hold up a little better this time around.  "Tell Me What You See" is probably Paul's weakest track on the album. George's "I Need You" and "You Like Me Too Much" are as good as Paul's "Tell Me What You See", and John's "I'ts Only Love". It's an improvement from "Don't Bother Me" from WTB. John seems to be going through the motions on "Dizzy Miss Lizzy".  Maybe he had just one too many takes but DML never worked for me, and Ringo's "Act Naturally" is entertaining to listen to and features great guitar work from George. Other songs from this era that did not make it to the album are "Bad Boy" which features a great Lennon vocal and would have worked better than "Dizzy Miss Lizzy". "I'm Down" a McCartney original would have also been a great closer. John's "Yes It Is" is a bit unusual and features a three part harmony, but just falls a little short for me.

Rubber Soul: (John number one) This may be John’s finest album in terms of quality to quantity ratio. Where should I start? I will rank them in order “Girl”, “In My Life” “Norwegian Wood”, and “Nowhere Man” are Grade “A” songs as good as anything else produces in the 60s. Lennon was hitting on all cylinders with these four. “Girl” has a melody that as good as anything McCartney and Brain Wilson  has ever produced and never gets the respect the song deserves. “In My Life” and “Nowhere Man” are autobiographical, yet have great melodies and singing. “Norwegian Wood”  is another great melody and mood for John, and George’s sitar fits so perfectly. “The Word” is collaboration by all 4 Beatles, and the song features a great vibe and harmonies and works on that level. “Run For Your Life" is not John’s best lyrics but the song works as a great rocker and closing track. The song’s theme is similar to John’s “You Can’t Do That”. “What Goes On” was co-written by McCartney and Starr. The tune would not work if John or Paul sang it as a rock tune, but I love the country twang that Ringo sings it with and Paul’s harmonies. Paul is second on this album. Most of his best work was helping the other Beatle’s develop their ideas on their tunes by adding cool harmonies or instrumentation. Paul’s best song is “Michelle”.   Some critics have called it sappy, but to me it’s a great standard up there with "Yesterday". The melody is so gorgeous. “You Won’t See Me" is such a departure from a typical Paul song and is one of the coolest sounding songs on the album. The track has a trippy effect of sounding like the Beatles are deliberately slowing down towards the fade out. “I’m Looking Through You” is another solid Paul tune that never gets discussed but holds up well. “Wait" is mostly Paul’s tune that was a throw away from the Help sessions, but the harmonies on this songs are arranged nicely and make the song. “Drive My Car” is wildly popular, but the song is only okay for me. Paul singing it with a different voice that sounds a bit contrived to me. Every now and then, Paul will use his so-called pseudo rocker voice, and it never sounds good to me. George is finally showing he can write decent songs with “Think For Yourself” and “If I Needed Someone”. “Think For Yourself” is hardly ever talked about but remains one of my favorites from Harrison. I love Paul’s fuzz bass and the 3 part harmonies throughout the song. The other 3 Beatles would do whatever it took to turn a potentially average filler type of song into something really cool and unique. That is exactly what happened on “Think For Yourself”. The singles for this album would have made Rubber Soul even more mind-boggling. “Day Tripper” was mostly John’s tune and “We Can Work It Out was mostly Paul’s, but they are two of their better tunes and would have complemented the album so beautifully. I hate how EMI would leave off the singles from the same sessions.   I always add the singles to the albums on my ipod.

Revolver: (Paul is number one)-Paul finally takes the lead and becomes the leader of the group on this album. I always here how great and innovative John was with “Tomorrow Never Knows” and “She Said She Said”, Lennon’s material simply falls short to Paul’s near perfection, and craftsmanship with tunes such as “Eleanor Rigby", “Here There And Everywhere”, and “For No One. Even Paul’s lesser songs are crafted so well that they could have been easily number one hits for any other band in 1966. “Got To Get You Into My Life” and “Good Day Sunshine” are great pop tunes! Paul’s “Yellow Submarine” is just daring and experimental as Lennon’s stuff and is an absolutely perfect choice for Ringo to sing as children’s song. What other band would dare to such a thing? The accompanying single for Revolver was “Paperback Writer” which is another tune up there with “Eleanor Rigby” as far as craftsmanship and originality. Don’t get me wrong. I love John’s stuff and creative direction, but I get tired of people foaming at the mouth at TNK. Paul also worked hard with John to achieve the sounds on “Tomorrow Never Knows”. The songs works as kind of an acid rock trance type of dance song that is meant to be cranked up loud, but I think Lennon would go on to write much better psychedelic songs on Pepper and Magical Mystery Tour. “She Said She Said” is a solid acid drenched song with energy and still sounds refreshing but still not on the same wave length as Paul’s “Eleanor Rigby”. Oddly enough, John’s I’m Only Sleeping” is my favorite of his from this album. It’s sound more eerie and is a perfect surreal ballad about sleeping and more truthful about his state of mind at the time. The “B” side to Paul’s “Paperback Writer” was John’s “Rain”. “Rain: is another acid rock song that could have easily replace “And Your Bird Can Sing” or George’s “Love You To” “Dr. Robert” is okay for me, and I never have liked the vocals on “And Your Bird Can Sing”. “And Your Bird Can Sing” just sounds like it’s lacking something and could have been better if it was reworked. George is showing consistency now with two albums of quality songs. “Taxman”, “I Want To Tell You” and “Love You To” fit the album nicely. Lennon and McCartney helped George considerable on "Taxman" with their harmonies and Paul’s lead guitar solo. You can tell all of the Beatles worked together on the track. “Love You To” falls a little short for me. The sitar was a ballsy move and sound exotic, but the tune is just very average.

 

Sgt. Pepper's: (Paul and John tied) Now Paul may get the nod for the idea, overall contribution, and productivity for SPLHCB. Lennon did not produce much, but his songs are my favorite on the album. Paul’s title track and the reprise are great rockers with great singing and instrumentation that are perfectly placed on the album. His best tune as far as craftsmanship is “She Leaving Home” which has been praised by many contemporary classical composers, and I love Lennon’s little bits in during the chorus. “When I’m Sixty Four” often gets written off as a corny little throw away tune, but the song is crafted so well. I always love Paul’s fun little novelty songs not to be taken too seriously. How can anyone resist not signing along to words and tuneful melody? “Lovely Rita”, “Getting Better”, and “Fixing a Whole” are good pop tunes but are not as strong as Paul’s stuff on Revolver. Any of Paul’s tunes on Revolver would have worked better than the three I just mentioned. Now for John’s stuff. My favorite tunes on SPLHCB are “Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds”, “Being the Benefit of Mr. Kite” and “A Day In The Life”, Now Paul sang and wrote the middle part of “A Day In The Life”, and arranged the crazy orchestra parts, but the tune was mostly John’s and is truly a master piece. I seem to get something different out of it with every listen. Who care if the lyrics for “Being the Benefit of Mr. Kite” were taken from a poster? It’s the psychedelic circus atmosphere and Lennon’s execution of the vocal track that works for me. I suppose he received a lot of help from Martin and McCartney, but the song works perfectly of the album. Lucy also captures some vivid imagery that has not been expressed in a pop song to date. I feel like I am literally walking into Lennon’s dream, and the arrangements and instrumentation work so well for the tune. Paul’s bass playing is so melodic for Lucy and much of this album. “Good Morning Good Morning” is just okay for me. I actually prefer the stripped down Anthology version without all of the animal noises. The song has one of the strangest rhythms and quirky arrangements and sounds like nothing else at the time. “With A Little Help From My Friends always bores me a bit, but captures the whole hippie vibe at the time. I prefer Joe Cocker’s version of the tune. I felt like George’s heart and mind were not into this album. George really needed a break more than the others from being a Beatle, and he was not a big fan of the whole Pepper Pseudo concept thing. “Within You Without” has always been tough for me to listen to all the way through. The hippie trippy feeling that he is going for sounds contrived to me. Strangely, I think Harrison would finally capture the trippy vibe that he was after on “Blue Jay Way”. George also had two other contributions from this period that were rejected by Martin and the other Beatles. “Only A Northern Song” and It’s All Too Much” were not considered up to par for an Album of Pepper’s magnitude and were shelved for Yellow Submarine. Two of this period’s best songs did not make it to the album. It was decided by EMI and Martin at the time to foolishly leave the tunes off the album and issue them as a double “A” single. “Strawberry Fields” and “Penny Lane” are two of the strongest Lennon/McCartney tracks and would have worked so beautifully with Pepper. Lennon seems to have now mastered the psychedelic pop genre with SFF and sounds very genuine and sincere in his vocal delivery. George Martin seems to have had the gift of capturing the atmosphere or ambience of what the artist was going for. The song is a psychedelic masterpiece and still sound fresh today. “Penny Lane” is a great McCartney track with gorgeous melody, beautifully arranged instrumentation, and translucent imagery that captures what it was like growing up in that part of Liverpool. If only the Beatles could have combined the best of SPLHCB with 3 or 4 songs from Magical Mystery Tour. 1967 was truly a remarkable year for the Beatles, but sadly the beginning of the end.

 

Sorry, I am running out of time. I will have finish with a quick synopsis for the remaining albums. Sorry for the bad grammar. Do not have time to proof read. And remember, these are just my opinions from a Beatle fan and are not meant to offend anyone.

Magical Mystery Tour: John is number one with Paul being a close second. “Strawberry Fields Forever” (read above review), “ I Am The Walrus” are psychedelic masterpieces that surprisingly do not sound contrived. “All You Need Is Love” works as such a strong anthem for the summer of ’67. I have never cared for “Baby You’re a Rich Man”. The song is also partially Paul’s. Paul’s tunes are almost as good. “Penny Lane” is brilliant (read review above). “Fool On The Hill” is a very underrated song with timeless melody. “Your Mother Should Know” always struck me as song that was not intended to be strange, but somehow fits perfectly on Magical Mystery Tour and is a bit of an oddity for the grannies, but I love the tune. “Magical Mystery Tour” has always worked for me the same way the title track for SPLHCB has worked. “Hello Goodbye” is shamefully poppy, but it is truly great at THAT! What a great sing a long! Who can resist? I have always like Harrison’s “Blue Jay Way” and have preferred it to his other kind of mystic sounding song attempts. I think he pulls it off with BJW. See Harrison on my Pepper review. “Flying” is okay and weird sounding. It fits the album and is just short enough.

The Beatles (White Album)-(John and Paul Tied)- I will be honest. I am not the biggest late Beatles fan. I like their later stuff but prefer their pre-1968 material, But I think the White Album is the best of their late Beatle period especially if you add the singles and songs recorded in early 1968 that should have made the album. “Hey Jude”, “Revolution”, “Lady Madonna”, Hey Bulldog”, “The Inner Light”, and “Across The Universe” could have made all made the album better. My favorite tunes off the album are “Happiness Is A Warm Gun” and “Sexy Sadie”, but you have a lot of average Paul songs and mediocre John songs. George is producing more, but nothing else he does on TWA is as good as “While My Guitar Gently Weeps”.

Yellow Submarine: Not really an album- I have broken down the songs on the corresponding albums that the tunes should have went on with the exception of Paul’s “All Together Now” is just a fun sing a long song for kids. Nothing more or less. George’s tunes are dreadful and were rightly thrown off Sgt. Pepper’s.

Abbey Road: George- John and Paul 2nd-. George’s tunes are lacking in quantity, but the quality is superior to John and Paul’s with the exception of John’s “Come Together”. George’s material sounds like Lennon/McCartney with George singing them. That’s how good they are. Did Lennon/McCartney write these for George? Too bad George did not have more of these type of songs up his sleeve during his career, but George peaked and carried the album with his penned “Something” and “Here Comes The Sun”. I love a cappella version of “Because” on the Love project. Lennon’s other tunes such as “I Want You” and his contribution to the medley falls short for me. Lennon’s heart was no longer into the Beatles and it shows, and to me, the medley is a bit overrated. It was a clever way to dispose a bunch of throw a way songs, but is it really as good the songs from Pepper or Revolver? Ringo’s Octopus’s Garden is nicely produced and is a good example of what the Beatles can still do if they ALL contribute together. Paul’s other tunes fall flat for me. “Oh Darling” always sounds generic to me, and do not like Paul’s pseudo rocker voice. “Maxwell Silver Hammer” is interesting the first time through but lacks the charm and authenticity of some of Paul’s other novelty type songs.

Let It Be: (Paul- is number one)- Lets face it! Without Paul’s tunes, this album would have been a wreck. Paul had his best output for 1969 during the Let It Be Sessions. “Let It Be”, “Get Back”, “Long and Winding Road” are such huge hits and standards. Lennon’s best tune was “Across The Universe” but was reworked from an early 1968 session. The song truly never received the effort from George Martin or Paul McCartney that it deserved. The rest of the material on the album just sounds sub-standard or under worked. The magic was fading. “One After 909” sounded uninspired. Paul uses his awful pseudo rocker voice again for “I’ve Got a Feeling”. The song sound generic and lacks Paul’s usually developed or well crafted melody, which is odd for Paul. “Dig A Pony” and “Dig It” is just John playing around without focus. “Two of Us” is just okay, but lacks real collaboration from the two of them. George is up to par with “For You Blue” and “I Me Mine”.

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