Mailman, Bring Me No More Blues

Anthology 3 album artworkWritten by: Roberts-Katz-Clayton
Recorded: 29 January 1969
Producer: George Martin
Engineer: Glyn Johns

Released: 28 October 1996

John Lennon: vocals, guitar
Paul McCartney: vocals, bass
George Harrison: guitar
Ringo Starr: drums

Available on:
Anthology 3

Originally released by Buddy Holly in 1957, Mailman, Bring Me No More Blues had been a part of The Beatles’ live repertoire until 1962. However, they didn’t recorded it until January 1969, during the Get Back sessions at the Apple Studios in London.

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Mailman, Bring Me No More Blues had been the b-side of Holly’s US hit single Words Of Love, itself covered by The Beatles on 1964′s Beatles For Sale. In the UK it had been an album track on the 1958 collection titled Buddy Holly.

The song was among a number of cover versions performed by The Beatles during the Get Back sessions. The group’s arrangement was slower than Holly’s, emphasising the sad, blues lyrics in place of the more uptempo pop original.

Lyrics

She wrote me only one sad line
Told me she’s no longer mine
Shoo shoo mailman, that will do for some time

Mailman, bring me no more blues
Mailman, bring me no more blues
One more heartache is all I can use

Mailman, bring me no more blues
Mailman, bring me no more blues

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9 Responses to “Mailman, Bring Me No More Blues”

  1. Phil O.

    I finally heard Holly’s version, close to 20 years after first hearing the Beatles version. Writing that the Beatles’ “arrangement was slower than Holly’s, emphasizing the sad, blues lyrics in place of the more uptempo pop original” is true, but doesn’t begin to describe how dramatically changed this song is from Holly’s tuneful, melodic original. A more faithful cover a la “Words of Love” would have sounded great on an early Beatles record.

    Reply
  2. Julie D.

    When I first heard this, I thought it was a foreign version of “Revolution.”

    Now I think it heavily influenced the latter. Especially hearing this 1969 version.

    Cool to know how long it had been in their repertoire – they were all big Buddy Holly fans…

    Reply
  3. Jim W.

    I would argue that the backing vocal is George, rather than Paul. It’s not easy to always tell, but in this case, I hear Mr. Harrison.

    Reply
  4. Rafael

    I think these are the correct lyrics:

    She wrote me only one sad line
    Told me she’s no longer mine
    Shoo shoo mailman, that will do for some time

    Mailman, bring me no more blues
    Mailman, bring me no more blues
    One more heartache is all I can use

    Mailman, bring me no more blues
    Mailman, bring me no more blues

    Reply
  5. Majorlance

    Hi Joe,

    “Mailman” is one of my favorite Fab cover versions! I have a correction, though: The name of the first composer should read “Roberts,” not “Robets.”

    Ruth Roberts, who passed away on June 30, 2011, also co-authored some well-known sports-related tunes, including “Mr. Touchdown, U.S.A.,” “It’s a Beautiful Day for a Ballgame” and “Meet the Mets.”

    Her New York times obit is here:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/05/arts/music/ruth-roberts-meet-the-mets-songwriter-dies-at-84.html?ref=deathsobituaries

    Reply
  6. Bill

    Being a lifelong Holly fan myself, I was always glad to see that The Beatles were too. The Crickets were the most influential band in rock & roll history in this sense; They were the first self-contained band. They played all their own instruments, wrote their own material, arranged it, recorded it & produced it the way they wanted (with help from Norman Petty). They were the first band to have artistic freedom in the studio. Bands nowadays take all of that freedom for granted, & every band that’s come along since owes that freedom to The Crickets, because they were the first.

    Reply

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