Effect of Beatles on the world..... | Page 2 | Yesterday... and today | Fab forum

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Effect of Beatles on the world.....
7 November 2011
3.13am
Into the Sky with Diamonds
New York
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Meanmistermustard is right about the merchandise.

The quantity was beyond belief.

I don't think there was anything like it before - or since.

As for movies, there had been plenty of musical acts doing movies (e.g. Elvis Presley), but A Hard Day's Night was quickly acknowledged (by VERY reluctant) critics as the best ever.

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Mr. Kite
"Into the Sky with Diamonds" (the Beatles and the Race to the Moon – a history)
7 November 2011
3.57am
kedame
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The merchandise is STILL overwhelming. I can't say how much money I have spent on Beatles merchandise. It would probably be an embarrassing amount.

"You can manicure a cat but can you caticure a man?" John Lennon- Skywriting by Word of Mouth
10 December 2014
8.39pm
Hildy
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The nineteen-sixties was a decade of adventure and new frontiers. Man travelled into space and to the moon and created a supersonic airliner that would fly faster than a speeding bullet. The white heat of technological change was upon us, but so too was a new age, and it was a popular music combo that heralded its arrival and influenced its form.

The Beatles, the most iconic musical group of the 20th century, and still flourishing in the 21st, was more than a  band of musically gifted young Liverpudlians: it was also a catalyst for change in society itself.

The early nineteen-sixties provided the perfect moment for their talent, genial irreverence, innovative look and confident attitude to shake the British establishment to its core and shape a new future. This was a revolution - a social and musical revolution. The advent of the Beatles marked the beginning of a more liberal and tolerant age - a new era where young people were acknowledged and catered for as an identifiable and relevant part of society.

Sons no longer had to become clones of their fathers. Young adults could have their own fashions, their own music and their own opinions. The radio days of Danny Street and the NDO performing cover versions of current hits on the BBC were numbered. The younger generation wanted colour and vitality and after the Beatles appeared on the scene, the country was never going to be the same again. Modern Britain had arrived. The post post-war era had been born.

Old habits were challenged, changed and cast aside. Young people wanted the freedom to fully express themselves and the dramatic event that was the coming of the Beatles signalled the dawning of a more enlightened time and the passing of a more structured and less tolerant period in British life.

The Beatles were certainly in the right place at the right time, but they had the talent, ability and personality to carry it off. They were articulate and good-humoured and their charm was hard to resist, even for older generations. While their long hair was frowned on and in some cases, detested, their self-belief and talent shone through. They could not be ignored.

The BBC's sporting flagship, Grandstand, even met them early one Saturday morning so that they could be interviewed after returning from an all-conquering tour of America. The Beatles were on the march, but it was a peaceful march and their presence changed society more beneficially than the combined efforts of those who were charged with carrying out that very same task: our politicians.

Somehow, the Beatles started a wave of change that swept around the globe and created a social and musical revolution.

If only all revolutions could be like this.

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parlance
10 December 2014
9.25pm
Ron Nasty
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Welcome, @Hildy. Always a pleasure to have somebody who lived through those years join us. I was born a few weeks before Sgt. Pepper so don't really recall the '60s!

"I only said we were bigger than Rod... and now there's all this!" Ron Nasty
11 December 2014
12.36am
Ahhh Girl
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@Hildy, I got to thinking about your post and thought that it would be a fantastic addition to this thread. If you like space stuff too, you and @Into the Sky with Diamonds will hit it off really well. He was around in the 60's to watch it all unfold. He has written a book that combines the story of the Beatles with the story of NASA. Very cool.

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Into the Sky with Diamonds
11 December 2014
2.04am
Hildy
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Regarding long hair, this was a real bone of contention at the time. The war had not long finished and everyone's dad had been in it, or at least it certainly seemed that way. My own father was in it for the duration and this militarised generation appreciated conformity in its sons and daughters.

Stepping out of line, being different and dissenting from the ways of previous generations was quite difficult, but the advent of the Beatles challenged old habits, and not in a way that was militant or violent. It was almost as though a youth culture was created where none had been before, and in Britain, by 1967, the conservative and staid BBC had even started its own popular music channel. At the time there were pirate stations providing music for Britain's youth illegally, and Radio One was a government attempt to give to the younger generation what it was missing - free and easy access to modern music as played by original artists.

Soon after, independent radio stations, which were common in the USA, were permitted in the UK too.

Long hair in men became a statement of nonconformity, but it was peaceful nonconformity. Our dads hated it but they grudgingly learned to live with it, and questioning dissent in youth began to take a hold. The attitude of youth changed from a reluctant compliance to peaceful assertiveness, and this new willingness not to be servants of previous generations, but to instead become a tide of changing attitudes eventually spread into all areas of society.

The Beatles didn't change the world by design, but their talent and gigantic popularity allowed their genial questioning attitude to spread across the globe and give out a message that was eagerly grasped by young people.

Somehow, the world changed, and the Beatles' role as a kind of figurehead of youth culture played a key part in this process. I was young during this whole episode, but I knew, and I knew that my adult relatives knew, that there was a change occurring. They didn't necessarily like it, and not every change was an improvement, but there was a movement from the post war era to a new post post-war era, and the Beatles were a fundamental part of it.

For the most part, it was very, very welcome - and I still have my hair long today!

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parlance
11 December 2014
3.08am
georgiewood
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That's one of the beauties of the Fab Forum, @Hildy: at almost the same time you are ascribing world-shaking powers of influence to our Lads, Mr. Sun King Coming Together starts another thread in which he asserts, provocatively, that "they didn't fundamentally change anything, either as a collective or on their own. They were 4 kids from Liverpool." a-hard-days-night-paul-10

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parlance, Joe, Into the Sky with Diamonds, Ahhh Girl, Annadog40
I say in speeches that a plausible mission of artists is to make people appreciate being alive at least a little bit. I am then asked if I know of any artists who pulled that off. I reply, 'The Beatles did'. Kurt Vonnegut, Timequake, 1997
11 December 2014
3.51pm
Into the Sky with Diamonds
New York
Apple rooftop
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Welcome Hildy! I agree - they changed everything.

Ironically, they were much more (successfully) revolutionary during their early success than when they (Lennon) became politically active.

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Ahhh Girl, parlance
"Into the Sky with Diamonds" (the Beatles and the Race to the Moon – a history)
12 December 2014
1.21am
Hildy
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If an academic was to write a serious history of the world in the 20th century, he would not mention Frank Sinatra, Led Zeppelin, Eric Clapton, Tom Jones, Bing Crosby, the Rolling Stones, Edward Elgar, the Eagles, Segovia, the Beach Boys or any number of highly successful musicians - but he would mention The Beatles.

It's impossible not to.

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