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60s slang!
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6 February 2011
2.11am
Nigel the good dog
Nowhere Land
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I use groovy and far-out all the time, but nobody has really made fun of me, yet. I bet somebody will, but I don't care. I just let it go.

My mind is far away, off in Pepperland…
I'm a girl, don't be confused by my name.
26 January 2015
2.04pm
Ahhh Girl
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@ewe2, while reading the thread babout The Beatles most dated song, I had the thought you might like this thread.

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ewe2
26 January 2015
2.38pm
ewe2
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Ta @Ahhh Girl I have a book of Australian slang that dates back to the 1960's and well beyond, if I can find it I'll throw some slang in here. Every time I hear 'groovy' these days I get a vision of Paul Simon in fishnets (mashup of 59th Street Song and Sweet Transvestite) :P I do hear 'far-out' occasionally too. Remember Brylcream? My dad used to call it 'greasy kid's stuff', I have no idea why.

Heavy: Serious or very emotional. I'm pretty sure this is older beatnik slang, the Beatles liked to grab the hipster stuff. Some terms like bread are older hipster/beatnik slang and didn't originate in the 60's but the boomers pretend they invented them. This happens a lot.

Dig - Get it, understand. Another beatnik term. I'm not sure if these were specifically Californian or New York but they're one or the other.

Skank/Skag - Unattractive boy/girl. We used to use it for both boys and girls. We tended to use skaghead for the boys though. I think it's had a comeback due to hip hop.

Old Man/Old Lady - Your parents, ugh. I first heard kids using this when I was a nipper and thought it was incredibly rude, I loved it. And then Elton John used it on a song and it didn't seem as cool.

Birds: attractive young women. British slang common in Australia in the 60's/70's.

You're right about Aussie slang being Americanized, it's gotten very strong in the last 20 years. My slang does tend to be incredibly British, and I put that down to being an early Xer growing up in the 60's and 70's when British culture was still influential (particularly all the comedy shows we used to get in the 70's and things like Minder).

26 January 2015
3.38pm
Von Bontee
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"My old lady/man" was also how many hippie-types referred to their significant others

One day, a tape-op got a tape on backwards, he went to play it, and it was all "Neeeradno-undowarrroom" and it was "Wow! Sounds Indian!" -- Paul McCartney
26 January 2015
7.04pm
Into the Sky with Diamonds
New York
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@ewe2 

Brillcream? Sure - every American kid used it (or something like it) to keep their hair in place - at least until the Beatles came around, at which point the 'dry look' became the fashion.

"A little dab'll do you" was the advertisement (for one of those creams)

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ewe2
"Into the Sky with Diamonds" (the Beatles and the Race to the Moon – a history)
27 January 2015
5.38am
C.R.A.
Land of the Rising Sun
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I'm surprised nick (steal) wasn't on the list.

Or in here.

“Send John out first; he’s the one they want.”

~ George Harrison

Memphis, 1966

27 January 2015
8.22am
ewe2
Inside the beat
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I always liked that slang "scrumping" and how specific it is to apples. Is it just West Country slang or is it applicable elsewhere? Nick has been used for "steal" since the 19th century but its Australian slang for jail from back then too!

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Silly Girl
27 January 2015
1.18pm
Ahhh Girl
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Into the Sky with Diamonds said

@ewe2 

Brillcream? Sure - every American kid used it (or something like it) to keep their hair in place - at least until the Beatles came around, at which point the 'dry look' became the fashion.

"A little dab'll do you" was the advertisement (for one of those creams)

Brylcreem ad from the 1950's

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Into the Sky with Diamonds, ewe2, Silly Girl
27 January 2015
1.26pm
Annadog40
I am here you are here we are here and we are all together
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ahdn_paul_06 That kinda ad is timeless since ads now for men's hair/body are very similar.

Never say never, cause it's never 'never'

 

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27 January 2015
1.35pm
Ahhh Girl
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Tale as old as time. Song as old as rhyme.

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Annadog40
27 January 2015
2.09pm
Hildy
The Star-Club
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A word that seemed to be invented in the sixties although it was probably just an old one re-born . . .

Hassle

"No hassle, man".

I seem to recall the Beatles using this one, and if I had to cite one particular Beatle who used it, I'd go for George.

27 January 2015
3.10pm
Into the Sky with Diamonds
New York
Apple rooftop
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@Ahhh Girl  Yes, the Brylcreem add - 'a little dab'll do you'

That would be in my top ten advertising tag lines.

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Ahhh Girl
"Into the Sky with Diamonds" (the Beatles and the Race to the Moon – a history)
27 January 2015
7.40pm
chrisredditch
Redditch
Carnegie Hall
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I'd contend "Hip" is 50's slang but I should get out more. Derives from Hit - Hep - Hep Cat I believe.

Threads, meaning clothes, is a word I still use and certain Mod slang also referring to clothing. For example "Watch the Cloth - Moth"

Also "Ticket" one who doesn't own a scooter and "Face". Right - I'm off before I blow my mind!

 

NB "Man" as a sentence ending was how we spoke like a hippy but they also used "The Man" to refer to anyone in authority.

The Beatles are English - They have influences from all over - but they are English

27 January 2015
7.48pm
Zig
The Toppermost of the Poppermost
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Did the term "skirt" (meaning a woman) originate in the 60's? 

"Watching the skirts you start to flirt now you're in gear."

To the fountain of perpetual mirth, Let it roll for all its worth.

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27 January 2015
11.54pm
Ahhh Girl
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Interesting thought. I bet the guys were watching the hemlines of skirts get shorter and shorter during the 60s.

28 January 2015
10.38am
chrisredditch
Redditch
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Ahhh Girl said
Interesting thought. I bet the guys were watching the hemlines of skirts get shorter and shorter during the 60s.

It soon became Watching The Hair beatlemaniacs_02_gif

The Beatles are English - They have influences from all over - but they are English

28 January 2015
2.44pm
Hildy
The Star-Club
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chrisredditch said

Ahhh Girl said
Interesting thought. I bet the guys were watching the hemlines of skirts get shorter and shorter during the 60s.

It soon became Watching The Hair beatlemaniacs_02_gif

We certainly were.

I remember seeing someone on television saying that the new fashion was for skirts to be four inches above the knee, however it didn't take long for mini-skirts to get considerably shorter than that.

Our dads had fought in a war and now their sons were growing up in an era where women's legs were on display as never before. Girls seemed to be competing with each other to see who could have the shortest skirt. Our dads were astonished but they looked on just as enthusiastically as the rest of us.

What a great era it was to be growing up.

And the no-bra look was coming . . .

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27 February 2015
5.01pm
Silly Girl
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I really dig British colloquialisms, Sixties slang, and British Sixties colloquial slang. Thanks to the Fabs a lot of those groovy words have entered my vocabulary full-time. Such as: 

  • I try not to say Fab and/or Gear unless I'm making fun of something, but it sneaks up on me.
  • Groovy is implacably in my lexicon and I can't get rid of it... even if I wanted to. There's something satisfying about saying "That's so flippin' GROOVY man!" especially when one is speaking of the Beatles. 
  • I never cared for far-out. And I'm surprised no one has yet mentioned:
  • being "keen on" something, or "dead keen" if you're.. well... dead keen on it. Still used today in England... that's keen... but it seems very fab-esque to me. Paul was and still is fond of that expression, as well as:
  • "It's a drag," which is also good...unless your best friend has been assassinated... ahdn_paul_01a-hard-days-night-john-7
  • Posh is a good one, if somewhat more modern. (Of course, they used it... 'the posh bird 'oo gets ev'rythin' wrong'.) 
  • Anything Liverpudlian-- Scouse-- is also groovy... I'm dead keen on it, it's fab.

 

Of course, along with my British and/or Sixties colloquialslangisms I also have a fondness for antiquated language, so my speeches are... most unorthodox. But nobody makes fun of me (and I wouldn't care if they did). a-hard-days-night-paul-11I'm homeschooled, and homeschoolers are, as a rule, unorthodox anyway. So nobody minds if you say the Fab Foursome are mind-blowingly groovy... BECAUSE THEY ARE. beatlemaniacs_02_gif 

A word of advice on speaking Scouse from ahdn_george_06George Harrison, Distinguished Scouser: It's all in your mind. 

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Ron Nasty
Half of what I say is meaningless... but I say it just to fill the other half with Beatlerubbish. 
 
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27 February 2015
5.34pm
Ron Nasty
"Where have you been?" "I'm not telling you..."
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@Silly Girl said
Paul was and is still fond of...

  • "It's a drag," which is also good...unless your best friend has been assassinated... ahdn_paul_01a-hard-days-night-john-7

I know I shouldn't, one of Paul's most awkward moments ever, but LOL! Very dry!

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"I only said we were bigger than Rod... and now there's all this!" Ron Nasty

27 February 2015
6.05pm
Silly Girl
Find me where ye echo lays
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Ron Nasty said

@Silly Girl said
Paul was and is still fond of...

  • "It's a drag," which is also good...unless your best friend has been assassinated... ahdn_paul_01a-hard-days-night-john-7

I know I shouldn't, one of Paul's most awkward moments ever, but LOL! Very dry!

Well, he's only a Northern Man. a-hard-days-night-paul-11

Half of what I say is meaningless... but I say it just to fill the other half with Beatlerubbish. 
 
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