60s slang! | Yesterday... and today | Fab forum

Please consider registering
Guest

Log In Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —

  
 

— Match —

   

— Forum Options —

   

Minimum search word length is 4 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

60s slang!
19 March 2010
12.01pm
McLerristarr
A Place
Carnegie Hall
Forum Posts: 257
Member Since:
13 November 2009
Offline

I'm quite sick of the slang used by myself and my fellow GenYs. I'm not sure about the rest of the world but here in Australia, the slang is starting to become thin, we've eliminated "dude", "mad" and "sick" as try-hard, and now only really use "awesome", "cool", "lame", "nice" and "gay" (as well as swearing). Our vocabulary is slowly diminishing (I was about to say "getting smaller") and by the time Generation Z come into power in the world, our language will have very few words left. I wish a new trend would start of reviving old 60s slang like The Beatles used to use.

I thought it would be fun if we started a list of 60s slang words.

Without thinking too much about it, I can think of:

  • Fab
  • Grotty
  • Naff
  • Deck (as in beat up)
  • Blew [my/our/etc] mind(s)
  • Man (at the end of a sentence) - never really left our language but was in prominent use in the hippy era

Not sure how many started in the 60s but I've heard the Beatles say them.

I hope in the 2060s (I'll be in my 70s then, that's a scary thought!) they'll be a 1960s revival (however brief it may be). Hopefully this applies to the centennials of the other decades as well.

19 March 2010
12.40pm
Joe
Pepperland
Admin
Forum Posts: 3497
Member Since:
31 March 2008
Offline

Gear: I think this was particularly common around 63-65, and meant 'great'. I'm not sure how widely it was used, but it appeared in many Beatles interviews.

Heavy: general 60s slang. Tony Bramwell tried to take credit for this in his memoir of questionable accuracy (review coming when I get round to writing it).

Grotty's an interesting one. Alun Owen invented it for A Hard Day's Night (to mean grotesque), but George Harrison really didn't want to say it. It's still in use today, though I suspect most people don't realise the origin.

Please don't spoil my day; I'm miles away

Can buy me love! Please consider using these links to support the Beatles Bible: Amazon | iTunes

19 March 2010
4.40pm
skye
AZ
Apple rooftop
Forum Posts: 2287
Member Since:
13 November 2009
Offline

Hmm, heavy. All I can think about is Back to the Future,

Dr. Emmett Brown:
There's that word again; "heavy". Why are things so heavy in the future?
Is there a problem with the earth's gravitational pull?

Ad hoc, ad loc, and quid pro quo! So little time! So much to know!
19 March 2010
11.31pm
Sunii
Candlestick Park
Forum Posts: 653
Member Since:
13 February 2010
Offline

McLerristarr said:

 

  • Fab
  • Grotty
  • Naff
  • Deck (as in beat up)
  • Blew [my/our/etc] mind(s)
  • Man (at the end of a sentence) - never really left our language but was in prominent use in the hippy era

 


 

It is funny how I use these words and I am not even from the 60s......a-hard-days-night-john-7

  Thursday night your stockings needed mending.
19 March 2010
11.52pm
iCaramba
Guest

Well, I'm a Generation X'er, so I'm a little closer to the '60s… I'm even old enough to remember (barely) a little bit of that decade.

McLerristarr, most of your words are British… only Beatles fans used fab, grotty, or naff in the U.S. But I think the three top '60s words have got to be…

dig, groovy, and far-out …as in, "I really dig your groovy lava lamp, man… it's far-out."

I also love how every event in the '60s had the word in added to it. Love-in, be-in, teach-in, and, of course, bed-in! Scenes were also popular… and uncool stuff was always a drag. "Man, I don't dig that crazy scene… what a drag!" (See also: "She's a drag… a well-known drag!")

Oh, and right on. That was verrrry '60s! ("Hey man, you and your old lady goin' to Woodstock?" "Right on, man... it's gonna be a stone groove.")

I'm sure I can think of a few more… sad thing is… most of those words are still in my regular vocabulary!! I'm such a hippie!

 

19 March 2010
11.58pm
iCaramba
Guest

Joe said:

Gear: I think this was particularly common around 63-65, and meant 'great'. I'm not sure how widely it was used, but it appeared in many Beatles interviews.


 

I think gear was a Scouse thing... I remember reading that it came from the French expression de rigeur and that it originated in the 'Pool. Correct me if I''m wrong, UK Beatlers...

20 March 2010
2.56am
McLerristarr
A Place
Carnegie Hall
Forum Posts: 257
Member Since:
13 November 2009
Offline

iCaramba said:

Joe said:

Gear: I think this was particularly common around 63-65, and meant 'great'. I'm not sure how widely it was used, but it appeared in many Beatles interviews.


 

I think gear was a Scouse thing… I remember reading that it came from the French expression de rigeur and that it originated in the 'Pool. Correct me if I''m wrong, UK Beatlers…


 

The Who said "gear" at a concert I went to last year so I don't think it was isolated to Liverpool, although it's possible it originated there.

20 March 2010
10.53pm
iCaramba
Guest

McLerristarr said:

The Who said "gear" at a concert I went to last year so I don't think it was isolated to Liverpool, although it's possible it originated there.


 

Hmmm, I stand corrected. What a drag!  a-hard-days-night-paul-1 Anyway, Urban Dictionary backs up your claim (http://www.urbandictionary.com.....?term=gear)... though it's not what one would call the ultimate authority.

Okay, more '60s terms:

split ("Let's split. This scene is a drag.")

bogart ("Don't bogart that joint, man... spread the love.")

bread ("Gotta get a job, man. I need the bread.")

 

21 March 2010
6.51pm
PaulRamon
Liverpool
The Star-Club
Forum Posts: 66
Member Since:
26 January 2010
Offline

Joe said:

Gear: I think this was particularly common around 63-65, and meant 'great'. I'm not sure how widely it was used, but it appeared in many Beatles interviews.

Heavy: general 60s slang. Tony Bramwell tried to take credit for this in his memoir of questionable accuracy (review coming when I get round to writing it).

Grotty's an interesting one. Alun Owen invented it for A Hard Day's Night (to mean grotesque), but George Harrison really didn't want to say it. It's still in use today, though I suspect most people don't realise the origin.


 

I remember reading that about grotty too Joe and i was really surprised because everyone in Liverpool uses it even to this day. 'Its dead grotty' When i was in Australia, i was saying it and they were asking what grotty meant and why i said dead before it. Its funny how you don't think about how you talk or what you say until you're taken out of your natural habitat.

 

a-hard-days-night-george-3

 

Onward my friends, and glory for the thirty ninth!!
21 March 2010
7.00pm
PaulRamon
Liverpool
The Star-Club
Forum Posts: 66
Member Since:
26 January 2010
Offline
10

McLerristarr said:

I'm quite sick of the slang used by myself and my fellow GenYs. I'm not sure about the rest of the world but here in Australia, the slang is starting to become thin, we've eliminated "dude", "mad" and "sick" as try-hard, and now only really use "awesome", "cool", "lame", "nice" and "gay" (as well as swearing).

 

 


 

It's funny you should mention that. I couldn't believe how often Australians said 'Awesome' on a recent visit. It didn't sound right and when i pointed this out a few Ozzies were saying it's becoming too Americanised over there.

C'mon Brisbane, start using 60's slang. Maybe next time i visit, my nephews and niece will be talking like The Beatles!    

Onward my friends, and glory for the thirty ninth!!
22 March 2010
4.12am
McLerristarr
A Place
Carnegie Hall
Forum Posts: 257
Member Since:
13 November 2009
Offline

PaulRamon said:

McLerristarr said:

I'm quite sick of the slang used by myself and my fellow GenYs. I'm not sure about the rest of the world but here in Australia, the slang is starting to become thin, we've eliminated "dude", "mad" and "sick" as try-hard, and now only really use "awesome", "cool", "lame", "nice" and "gay" (as well as swearing).

 

 


 

It's funny you should mention that. I couldn't believe how often Australians said 'Awesome' on a recent visit. It didn't sound right and when i pointed this out a few Ozzies were saying it's becoming too Americanised over there.

C'mon Brisbane, start using 60's slang. Maybe next time i visit, my nephews and niece will be talking like The Beatles!    


 

I live in Brisbane and it's absolutely true that Australia is very Americanised, mostly because the majority of our TV is American. It's ironic because I always point it out and Australians tend to deny it saying they don't like American culture. We use British spelling in Australia but the Labour Party that's in power at the moment spells it's name "Labor" for no apparent reason.

I'm sick of our boring way of speaking - bring on the 60s revival!

4 February 2011
10.29pm
deboraht
Casbah Coffee Club
Forum Posts: 22
Member Since:
4 February 2011
Offline
12

Out of sight or outa sight man

Happening - as an event or as it was really happening. the happenning thing

Gas

Grouse (surfer)

Blast (have a blast)

Bummer

Cool

Flip your wig

Drag

Fink

Freak out

Hang loose

Hip

Lay it on me

Pad (your pad or mine)

Stoned

Wiggy, or wiggin out

4 February 2011
11.55pm
mr. Sun king coming together
Nowhere Land
Apple rooftop
Forum Posts: 6916
Member Since:
19 September 2010
Offline
13

Getting pissed is to get drunk.

I tried to think of something powerful and moving… and failed.  "You were given a choice between war and dishonor - you chose dishonor, and you shall have war" - Winston Churchill
5 February 2011
12.56am
StarWisher
Apple rooftop
Forum Posts: 1162
Member Since:
25 November 2010
Offline
14

a-hard-days-night-ringo-8That's still being used quite a lot today! (Though I was confused the first few times I heard it, myself.) Not sure if it's from the 60s.

"We are all a little weird and life's a little weird, and when we find someone whose weirdness is compatible with ours, we join up with them and fall in mutual weirdness and call it love." — Dr. Seuss
 
 
5 February 2011
1.04am
mr. Sun king coming together
Nowhere Land
Apple rooftop
Forum Posts: 6916
Member Since:
19 September 2010
Offline
15

I heard it in Anthology, from a-hard-days-night-george-4, about what the Brits always did.

I tried to think of something powerful and moving… and failed.  "You were given a choice between war and dishonor - you chose dishonor, and you shall have war" - Winston Churchill
5 February 2011
1.54am
Zig
The Toppermost of the Poppermost
Moderator



Forum Posts: 4555
Member Since:
14 April 2010
Offline
16

This site cites 60's sang.

mal-evans

To the fountain of perpetual mirth, Let it roll for all its worth.

Every Little Thing you buy from Amazon or iTunes will help the Beatles Bible if you use these links: Amazon | iTunes

5 February 2011
2.14am
mr. Sun king coming together
Nowhere Land
Apple rooftop
Forum Posts: 6916
Member Since:
19 September 2010
Offline
17

What I hate is the Bad Rap slang people use. Great thread idea.

I tried to think of something powerful and moving… and failed.  "You were given a choice between war and dishonor - you chose dishonor, and you shall have war" - Winston Churchill
5 February 2011
3.03am
StarWisher
Apple rooftop
Forum Posts: 1162
Member Since:
25 November 2010
Offline

Zig said:

This site cites 60's sang.

mal-evans


This is great! It's so weird to see some of the slang that came about in the 60s is still going strong today.
 

And I thought Toys in The Attic was just an Aerosmith song.

I love etymology. I could make this post a mile long commenting on everything on that page that strikes my interest.

"We are all a little weird and life's a little weird, and when we find someone whose weirdness is compatible with ours, we join up with them and fall in mutual weirdness and call it love." — Dr. Seuss
 
 
5 February 2011
3.33am
MeanMrsMustard
Nowhere Land
Apple rooftop
Forum Posts: 2776
Member Since:
9 June 2010
Offline
19

Wow. I think a lot of this is how I talk normally. 

But I'm going to draw the line at drug/alcohol/tobacco references (whoops! There goes the entire page) and adding "man" to the end of all my sentences.

Also, saying "groovy" and "far-out" will ensure that I will be mocked for the rest of my life. 

If I seem to act unkind, it's only me, it's not my mind that is confusing things.

5 February 2011
1.37pm
mr. Sun king coming together
Nowhere Land
Apple rooftop
Forum Posts: 6916
Member Since:
19 September 2010
Offline
20

MeanMrs.Mustard said:

Wow. I think a lot of this is how I talk normally. 

But I'm going to draw the line at drug/alcohol/tobacco references (whoops! There goes the entire page) and adding "man" to the end of all my sentences.

Also, saying "groovy" and "far-out" will ensure that I will be mocked for the rest of my life. 

Not By Us, just by everyone else


I tried to think of something powerful and moving… and failed.  "You were given a choice between war and dishonor - you chose dishonor, and you shall have war" - Winston Churchill
Forum Timezone: Europe/London

Most Users Ever Online: 597

Currently Online:
53 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
1 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

meanmistermustard: 10432

mr. Sun king coming together: 6916

Ahhh Girl: 5554

parlance: 5532

Annadog40: 4770

mithveaen: 4651

Zig: 4555

Mr. Kite: 4338

Ron Nasty: 3221

fabfouremily: 2949

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 88

Members: 2686

Moderators: 4

Admins: 2

Forum Stats:

Groups: 3

Forums: 34

Topics: 3148

Posts: 140772

Newest Members: ieatglitter, phile24, ZoeLouk, arsentev78, Rocky You're a Blackbird

Moderators: Ahhh Girl: 5554, meanmistermustard: 10432, Zig: 4555, Joe: 3497

Administrators: Joe: 3497, Ellie: 1

Members Birthdays
Today: None
Upcoming: None