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Harrison-Starr's contributions to songs
12 July 2014
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I wanna know what are Harrison-Starr's contributions to the Beatles songs. I know they did 95% of all the work on their songs while writing and composing melodies but did George compose any Riff or Solo for any Lennon-McCartney's songs and did Ringo came up with all the Beats by himself or it was also only Lennon-McCartney. Please don't say they play Guitar and Drums respectively, I am well aware of that.   

12 July 2014
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Good question. I once read something by Paul saying that he never really had to tell Ringo exactly what to do, he just seemed to play the right thing. I could be wrong on that though. 

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12 July 2014
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The one that comes immediately to mind is that George came up with the dominant guitar riff in And I Love Her

There are many more but my brain is numb from the football.

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13 July 2014
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vonbontee
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Mimi said
Good question. I once read something by Paul saying that he never really had to tell Ringo exactly what to do, he just seemed to play the right thing. I could be wrong on that though. 

Interesting answer, since he latterly spent so much time telling George what to play. And there's that little scrap of notepaper on which he sketched out the whole "Hey Jude" arrangement (piano...drums enter...etc.) Plus there was "Ticket To Ride".

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13 July 2014
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I'd like to know exactly who did what when they re-arranged 'Please Please Me'

 

George Martin had heard it and it was thought too slow. It was arranged or at least sung as a Roy Orbison type song. I've never heard that version. But I'm imagining that a lot of work was done to speed it up.

 

The arrangement of 'PPM' has so many hooks….. the harmonica…..the rushing chords after…'to my girl' The 5 guitar notes after ….'never reason why girl'  The drum fill before …...'I don't ever start complaining but you know there's always rain in my heart' etc. It goes on and on and the song is only a couple of minutes long.

 

I've come to appreciate this song very late in the day…….only since I saw Paul close one of his shows with it. I think the crowd's reaction was too good for Paul's liking….Being a John song in a Paul show, but that's neither here no there.

 

Who contributed what to the re-arrangement of 'PPM' brought finished to George Martin would be very illustrative….. It's John's song did he take the lead…..did Paul or did they all chip in. I would love to know who did what. It would frame from an early time their method when the chips were down time was short and it mattered to them all……..Paul and Ringo could tell us…….  

 

13 July 2014
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Duke_of_Kirkcaldy
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George presumably also came up with the idea of using the sitar on "Norwegian Wood" after everyone realized the song 'needed something else.'

13 July 2014
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Linde
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Is this just about instrumental bits? Because they both contributed a small amount of lyrics to some songs as well.

13 July 2014
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Linde said

Is this just about instrumental bits? Because they both contributed a small amount of lyrics to some songs as well.

Unless the OP says otherwise, I would like to see the lyrics parts included also in this discussion.

14 July 2014
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Ahhh Girl said

Linde said

Is this just about instrumental bits? Because they both contributed a small amount of lyrics to some songs as well.

Unless the OP says otherwise, I would like to see the lyrics parts included also in this discussion.

Well, Ringo got his writing credit for "What Goes On" by contributing, what he says, 'about 5 words' to the song... which makes one wonder what those 5 words were.  a-hard-days-night-ringo-12

14 July 2014
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Ringo came up with the title of A Hard Days Night

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14 July 2014
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Annadog40 said
Ringo came up with the title of A Hard Days Night

And 8 Arms To Hold You, before it became Help!  a-hard-days-night-ringo-6

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14 July 2014
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Its generally supposed that Ringo would have contributed the "tides of time" lyric due to his fondness of c&w. Nothing definite tho. 

They both contributed to Yellow Submarine, wasn't "darning his socks" one of Ringos'.

I'm sure i read once that one line of contribution was George bringing in the riff for I Feel Fine or it was he who worked it into the song, however it is generally believed that John who stole the riff straight from Bobby Parker's 'Watch Your Step' so no idea. Maybe it was a different song.

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14 July 2014
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Hehe, finally I can reply again (for some reason everytime I clicked on reply it started loading but didn't do anything)

Ringo came up with a few things as already mentioned, but he also came up with the ''darning his socks in the night when there's nobody there, what does he care'' line in Eleanor Rigby. In the same song, George came up with ''Ah, look at all the lonely people''

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15 July 2014
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I remember George mentioning in an interview that he also contributed some lyrics to Come Together - though I'm not sure which ones, and he came up with the title "Sexy Sadie".

Here are some of the things George has contributed:

"I had the idea, the title, had a couple of verses and the basic idea for it, then I took it to John to finish it off and we wrote the middle together. Which is nice: ‘Life is very short. There’s no time for fussing and fighting, my friend.’ Then it was George Harrison’s idea to put the middle into waltz time, like a German waltz. That came on the session, it was one of the cases of the arrangement being done on the session."

— Paul McCartney on “We Can Work It Out”, Many Years From Now by Barry Miles

"However, once Beatlemania kicked in, it became unthinkable to replace any of the four. But, good as this was for Harrison's and Starr's places in the band, the increasing sophistication of the arrangements was overlooked in the celebrity frenzy that accompanied the group. One result was that Harrison's musical skills were underestimated again. An example is the closing sixth chord for their epochal single "She Loves You" - this harmonic sophistication was Harrison's idea, but the kind of musical detail that was increasingly ignored in the media frenzy that began to report on the Beatles as a social phenomenon rather than a music group."

— Simon Leng, While My Guitar Gently Weeps: The Music of George Harrison pg. 13

"Lennon and Harrison’s pieces are guitar-led, and are collaborative efforts. McCartney’s, being the product of a more versatile musical mind, were largely based on piano foundations. And characteristically, Harrison’s role on Lennon’s songs is considerable - he developed the thrilling major-scale lead parts for “And Your Bird Can Sing,” and can clearly be heard ‘finding the notes’ on the early take released on Anthology 2. Then there were the backward guitar solos he painstakingly created for “I’m Only Sleeping,” a tune that arrived at Abbey Road with just acoustic guitar chords. Mark Lewisohn’s The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions reports that the idea and execution of the parts for Lennon’s drowsy classic were entirely George’s. In an extraordinary act of dedication, Harrison worked for six hours first settling on a string of notes, then writing the sequence in reverse order and playing that part. And he double-tracked it. He also created a guitar coda tonally and rhythmically based on Indian forms. “I’m Only Sleeping” is a classic example of the massive influence Harrison had on arranging the band’s songs in this period.

Another key song on the album for George was “She Said She Said,” created in the first Abbey Road session during which a Beatle offered a general ‘fuck you’ and stalked out. Perhaps surprisingly, this was Paul McCartney, who by his own account was dismayed that his input on the recording was minimal. The problem was that between them Lennon and Harrison had routined the tune, with Harrison helping Lennon fuse the ‘when I was a boy’ segment to the main verse to complete the song. It had started out a completely different piece, as Harrison later commented: ‘I was at his house one day and he was struggling with some tunes. He had loads of bits, maybe three songs that were unfinished, and I made suggestions and helped him to work them together so that they became one finished song.’

And in the studio the lead guitarist’s arranging skills were prominent in developing the song, which is driven and characterized by his powerful, distorted Gibson SG riffs. Harrison’s licks give a response to each line of Lennon’s vocal, providing a slightly different melodic twist while simultaneously offering rhythmic support with picked chords. In effect, George’s lead becomes a second voice - entirely apposite for a piece that is about the relationship between tellers and listeners. After all, “She Said She Said” is a song about voices."

— Simon Leng, While My Guitar Gently Weeps: The Music of George Harrison pg. 21

"The best of the group's collective abilities was found on "Tomorrow Never Knows," a work that gathered the skills and inspiration of the whole band. Supporting Lennon's wonderous vocal are whirls of tape loops, telepathic bass-drum synergy from McCartney and Starr, and another precise backward guitar solo from Harrison. He also provided the first use of the classic Indian drone instrument, the tamboura, to the track - it introduces the song with a power it was not designed for in the Indian setting, but does underpin the philosophical substrata to the lyric."

— Simon Leng, While My Guitar Gently Weeps: The Music of George Harrison pg. 22

GW: When you came back from India, did you intentionally copy on guitar any of the techniques you learned there?
Harrison: When I got back from this incredible journey to India, we were about to do "Sgt. Pepper's," which I don't remember much at all. I was into my own little world, and my ears were just all filled up with all this Indian music. So I wasn't really into sitting there, thrashing through [sings nasally], "I'm Fixing A Hole…" Not that song, anyway. But if you listen to "Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds," you'll hear me try and play the melody on guitar with John's voice, which is what the instrumentalist does in Hindustani vocal music.

- Guitar World, 1992

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15 July 2014
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"Harrison barely had any role to play on Paul's songs - he made audible contributions to only "Birthday" and "Back in the U.S.S.R." And the last of these was cut in extremis after Starr's walkout, leaving McCartney to pick up the drumsticks. Here Harrison's inventive fills are the sonic glue that holds the Beatle sound together, but barely. And while Harrison's guitar was prominent on "Back in the U.S.S.R," his ideas were not always welcome on Paul's material.

[...] As ever, George made a significant contribution to Lennon's arrangements, adding the lead guitar framework that was noticeably absent from McCartney's songs. Notably, Harrison's lead gave structure to "Yer Blues," grumbling bent bass notes punctuating Lennon's litany of doom, while a jaunty R&B figure highlights the satirical melodrama of "if I ain't dead already." He provides a similarly telepathic performance to support the minidrama of "Dear Prudence." Here Harrison's lead forms a substratum of the arrangement, building on Lennon's picked rhythm figures but crucially driving the song emotionally, as Lennon's voice often did on other tunes. As Lennon urges "Prudence" to come out and play, Harrison builds the tension by stepping through a high-register D major scale, perhaps inspired by Jimi Hendrix's similarly climactic "All Along the Watchtower" solo.

If "Dear Prudence" offered a welcome return to Revolver-era Lennon-Harrison musical empathy, "Happiness Is A Warm Gun" found the two collaborating to turn inspired fragments into a finished product. The last time they had worked this closely on a song was on "She Said She Said." The Anthology 3 set includes the first run-through at Harrison's Esher home at the end of May. On this acoustic demo Lennon is heard finding his way through the four parts of the song, and even looking for the correct chords to match the melody. At one point, in frustration with himself, he declares, "Oh shit, wrong chord!" Comparing this nascent scattershot exploration of ideas with the finished version gives a classic exposition of Harrison's critical role in developing Lennon's ideas. Initially Harrison's lead merely punctuates Lennon's picked chords with driving power chords, but his fuzzed lead later provides the bridge to the "I need a fix" section, by giving an elliptical version of the new melody. This is clearly a Harrison concept.

The combination of Lennon's spontaneous bursts of raw inspiration with Harrison's methodical, musically erudite precision was compelling, and equally audible on "Everybody's Got Something To Hide Except Me And My Monkey." Again, the Esher demo has none of the electric guitar structure of the release version, meaning that Harrison's part in the "creative act" was to "compose" the riffs and fills that provide the song's backbone."

— Simon Leng, While My Guitar Gently Weeps: The Music of George Harrison pg. 35-36

And this isn't anything specific but I think it sheds some light on his importance in the band:

MOJO: Any other moments where George really brought something to the song?

PAUL: I think George always brought something to all the songs. Me, George and John originally had a little set-up with just the three of us on three guitars. That was our first kinda little incarnation. And we would go to talent shows and lose them with that line-up. [chuckles] So what I mean is, any of us could take the guitar parts. So, for instance, I Feel Fine was John's riff and started off by him leaning the guitar inadvertently against an amp and it fed back so we used that into the... [sings the opening riff]. But often opening riffs - certainly solos - would be George. I could go through 'em all and just say, That's George, that's George, that's George. 'Cos I was there, you know. [chuckles]

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18 July 2014
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bewareofchairs said 
 
"Lennon and Harrison’s pieces are guitar-led, and are collaborative efforts. McCartney’s, being the product of a more versatile musical mind, were largely based on piano foundations. And characteristically, Harrison’s role on Lennon’s songs is considerable - he developed the thrilling major-scale lead parts for “And Your Bird Can Sing,” and can clearly be heard ‘finding the notes’ on the early take released on Anthology 2. Then there were the backward guitar solos he painstakingly created for “I’m Only Sleeping,” a tune that arrived at Abbey Road with just acoustic guitar chords. Mark Lewisohn’s The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions reports that the idea and execution of the parts for Lennon’s drowsy classic were entirely George’s. In an extraordinary act of dedication, Harrison worked for six hours first settling on a string of notes, then writing the sequence in reverse order and playing that part. And he double-tracked it. He also created a guitar coda tonally and rhythmically based on Indian forms. “I’m Only Sleeping” is a classic example of the massive influence Harrison had on arranging the band’s songs in this period.

Another key song on the album for George was “She Said She Said,” created in the first Abbey Road session during which a Beatle offered a general ‘fuck you’ and stalked out. Perhaps surprisingly, this was Paul McCartney, who by his own account was dismayed that his input on the recording was minimal. The problem was that between them Lennon and Harrison had routined the tune, with Harrison helping Lennon fuse the ‘when I was a boy’ segment to the main verse to complete the song. It had started out a completely different piece, as Harrison later commented: ‘I was at his house one day and he was struggling with some tunes. He had loads of bits, maybe three songs that were unfinished, and I made suggestions and helped him to work them together so that they became one finished song.’

And in the studio the lead guitarist’s arranging skills were prominent in developing the song, which is driven and characterized by his powerful, distorted Gibson SG riffs. Harrison’s licks give a response to each line of Lennon’s vocal, providing a slightly different melodic twist while simultaneously offering rhythmic support with picked chords. In effect, George’s lead becomes a second voice - entirely apposite for a piece that is about the relationship between tellers and listeners. After all, “She Said She Said” is a song about voices."

— Simon Leng, While My Guitar Gently Weeps: The Music of George Harrison pg. 21

"The best of the group's collective abilities was found on "Tomorrow Never Knows," a work that gathered the skills and inspiration of the whole band. Supporting Lennon's wonderous vocal are whirls of tape loops, telepathic bass-drum synergy from McCartney and Starr, and another precise backward guitar solo from Harrison. He also provided the first use of the classic Indian drone instrument, the tamboura, to the track - it introduces the song with a power it was not designed for in the Indian setting, but does underpin the philosophical substrata to the lyric."

— Simon Leng, While My Guitar Gently Weeps: The Music of George Harrison pg. 22

GW: When you came back from India, did you intentionally copy on guitar any of the techniques you learned there?
Harrison: When I got back from this incredible journey to India, we were about to do "Sgt. Pepper's," which I don't remember much at all. I was into my own little world, and my ears were just all filled up with all this Indian music. So I wasn't really into sitting there, thrashing through [sings nasally], "I'm Fixing A Hole…" Not that song, anyway. But if you listen to "Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds," you'll hear me try and play the melody on guitar with John's voice, which is what the instrumentalist does in Hindustani vocal music.

- Guitar World, 1992

Comments like these sort of reinforce my sentiment that Revolver was their most genuinely collaborative and creative album.  Paul started asserting himself more on Sgt. Pepper, and by the White Album, they were mostly doing their own things and/or playing backing band to whomever's song they were recording.

18 July 2014
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Mimi
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vonbontee said

Mimi said
Good question. I once read something by Paul saying that he never really had to tell Ringo exactly what to do, he just seemed to play the right thing. I could be wrong on that though. 

Interesting answer, since he latterly spent so much time telling George what to play. And there's that little scrap of notepaper on which he sketched out the whole "Hey Jude" arrangement (piano...drums enter...etc.) Plus there was "Ticket To Ride".

I would imagine Ringo would be doing more of his original ideas on John or George songs. Paul did play the drums after all, and could be very controlling in the studio. Who knows. I wish I could remember what book I read that in though. ahdn_paul_01

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27 July 2014
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Duke_of_Kirkcaldy said

bewareofchairs said 
 
"Lennon and Harrison’s pieces are guitar-led, and are collaborative efforts. McCartney’s, being the product of a more versatile musical mind, were largely based on piano foundations. And characteristically, Harrison’s role on Lennon’s songs is considerable - he developed the thrilling major-scale lead parts for “And Your Bird Can Sing,” and can clearly be heard ‘finding the notes’ on the early take released on Anthology 2. Then there were the backward guitar solos he painstakingly created for “I’m Only Sleeping,” a tune that arrived at Abbey Road with just acoustic guitar chords. Mark Lewisohn’s The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions reports that the idea and execution of the parts for Lennon’s drowsy classic were entirely George’s. In an extraordinary act of dedication, Harrison worked for six hours first settling on a string of notes, then writing the sequence in reverse order and playing that part. And he double-tracked it. He also created a guitar coda tonally and rhythmically based on Indian forms. “I’m Only Sleeping” is a classic example of the massive influence Harrison had on arranging the band’s songs in this period.

Another key song on the album for George was “She Said She Said,” created in the first Abbey Road session during which a Beatle offered a general ‘fuck you’ and stalked out. Perhaps surprisingly, this was Paul McCartney, who by his own account was dismayed that his input on the recording was minimal. The problem was that between them Lennon and Harrison had routined the tune, with Harrison helping Lennon fuse the ‘when I was a boy’ segment to the main verse to complete the song. It had started out a completely different piece, as Harrison later commented: ‘I was at his house one day and he was struggling with some tunes. He had loads of bits, maybe three songs that were unfinished, and I made suggestions and helped him to work them together so that they became one finished song.’

And in the studio the lead guitarist’s arranging skills were prominent in developing the song, which is driven and characterized by his powerful, distorted Gibson SG riffs. Harrison’s licks give a response to each line of Lennon’s vocal, providing a slightly different melodic twist while simultaneously offering rhythmic support with picked chords. In effect, George’s lead becomes a second voice - entirely apposite for a piece that is about the relationship between tellers and listeners. After all, “She Said She Said” is a song about voices."

— Simon Leng, While My Guitar Gently Weeps: The Music of George Harrison pg. 21

"The best of the group's collective abilities was found on "Tomorrow Never Knows," a work that gathered the skills and inspiration of the whole band. Supporting Lennon's wonderous vocal are whirls of tape loops, telepathic bass-drum synergy from McCartney and Starr, and another precise backward guitar solo from Harrison. He also provided the first use of the classic Indian drone instrument, the tamboura, to the track - it introduces the song with a power it was not designed for in the Indian setting, but does underpin the philosophical substrata to the lyric."

— Simon Leng, While My Guitar Gently Weeps: The Music of George Harrison pg. 22

GW: When you came back from India, did you intentionally copy on guitar any of the techniques you learned there?
Harrison: When I got back from this incredible journey to India, we were about to do "Sgt. Pepper's," which I don't remember much at all. I was into my own little world, and my ears were just all filled up with all this Indian music. So I wasn't really into sitting there, thrashing through [sings nasally], "I'm Fixing A Hole…" Not that song, anyway. But if you listen to "Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds," you'll hear me try and play the melody on guitar with John's voice, which is what the instrumentalist does in Hindustani vocal music.

- Guitar World, 1992

Comments like these sort of reinforce my sentiment that Revolver was their most genuinely collaborative and creative album.  Paul started asserting himself more on Sgt. Pepper, and by the White Album, they were mostly doing their own things and/or playing backing band to whomever's song they were recording.

I would agree with that. I must admit, even though I've always liked Revolver, I didn't think it was as great as a lot of other Beatles fans, but reading more about it has really made me appreciate how special it was.

Things like this also make me sad that John didn't collaborate with George more throughout his career and never acknowledged how helpful he was (at least publicly).

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28 July 2014
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My friends think that I'm something of an expert on the Beatles………They're wrong.

Almost every time i read this forum I learn something new…….Obvious things that an expert would know.

The submissions from 'beware of chairs' were real eye-openers.

 

This morning for my daily stroll along the beach I revisited a record very familiar to me….. A record 'Ive listened a thousand times since it's release in '66 when I was a boy of 14. If George really contributed without John's direction the things that are claimed as his on She Said…..Only Sleeping……And Your Bird……etc then I've not been giving credit where it's due.

It struck me walking along how Paul was getting more into George Martin's in-put on Revolver…..barrelhouse piano, Good Day Sunshine……percussive brass, Got To Get You Into My Life…..French horns and such while John was happy with George's precise guitar arrangements. John's reliance on George knitted paul and Martin closer together…..A mutual respect that would pay off for Paul. 

John's backer…..Brian was still alive for this album and Pepper……But the Paul/Martin duo held sway after All You Need Is Love………relegating John to 'B' sides from Walrus behind Hello Goodbye onwards…….Revolution/Don't let me Down.

What's clear to me now is just how valuable the others were to John's 'raw creativity'

 

I've really badly underestimated George………I have a whole work of study in-front of me.

 

Thanks

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28 July 2014
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Everybody is learning new things on here and elsewhere, even the experts and brainiacs we look up to and respet don't know everything. Folk who says they know everything are deluded.

 

The farther one travels
The less one knows
The less one really knows 

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