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Paul's Americanisms
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7 September 2013
8.15pm
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Ron Nasty
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cbatcu said
Speaking of "yeah", I read somewhere that someone didn't want the Beatles to use "yeah" in "
She Loves You" because it sounded too Americanized.

Paul's dad, Jim. "Couldn't you sing, 'Yes! Yes! Yes!'?"

"I only said we were bigger than Rod... and now there's all this!" Ron Nasty

7 September 2013
8.34pm
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Funny Paper
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cbatcu said

Funny Paper said
There are certain Beatles songs where the English comes out -- "This Bird Has Flown", "Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite", "
A Day In The Life"; etc.

And don't forget the richly upper-crust accent Paul uses in parts of "Uncle Albert"!

Now that I think about it, I guess this is why I love "English Tea" and "Penny Lane" so much (edit: yes "A Day In The Life" also like you mentioned). Some other Britishnesses that comes to mind:

Isle of Wight ; barrow in the marketplace (makes me think of market day in Moreton-in-Marsh) ; Mr. Wilson & Mr. Heath ; National Trust ; a man named Lear & Daily Mail ; a pint a day ; playing conkers

Wonder why they used raincoats instead of macs in "Two of Us"? And there's a raincoat in "Another Day".

I do have to admit I like "Mrs. Vanderbilt". Actually, that is the song that got me so hooked back in May at the concert.

mja6758 said

And it is "sminking" - he meant to sing "stinking". Great word though.

Hope this helps

I have a lot more listening and sorting out to do with some of these words. For example, in "That Was Me", I was hearing beaches but he is singing picture. Yikes! In "The Pound is Sinking", the way he says/sings the word appalling, it sounds like a-paul-ing.

 

Also "Eleanor Rigby" and "She's Leaving Home" -- very British.  Maybe the more apt question is why did John and Paul tend to sound more upper class in their English accents while singing, rather than Liverpuddlian?

While there are raincoats in those songs you mentioned, there is from "Mamunia" --

So lay down your umber-rellas

strip off your plastic macs

you never felt the rain my friend

till you felt it running down your back...

And speaking of "Penny Lane", don't forget

And the banker never wears a mac

in the pouring rain...

In "Two Of Us" at least, there is a definite need for a two-syllable word, and without "raincoat", you're stuck either with one syllable ("macs") or four ("mackintoshes").

P.S.: Your comment about hearing the wrong word in "That Was Me" reminded me there's a topic buried somewhere in the archives here all about mis-hearing words in various songs.  I don't know exactly which section it's in...

 

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7 September 2013
8.47pm
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Ahhh Girl
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Funny Paper said

cbatcu said

Now that I think about it, I guess this is why I love "English Tea" and "Penny Lane" so much ...

I do have to admit I like "Mrs. Vanderbilt". Actually, that is the song that got me so hooked back in May at the concert.

Also "Eleanor Rigby" and "She's Leaving Home" -- very British.  Maybe the more apt question is why did John and Paul tend to sound more upper class in their English accents while singing, rather than Liverpuddlian?

While there are raincoats in those songs you mentioned, there is from "Mamunia" --

So lay down your umber-rellas

strip off your plastic macs

you never felt the rain my friend

till you felt it running down your back...

And speaking of "Penny Lane", don't forget

And the banker never wears a mac

in the pouring rain...

In "Two Of Us" at least, there is a definite need for a two-syllable word, and without "raincoat", you're stuck either with one syllable ("macs") or four ("mackintoshes").

P.S.: Your comment about hearing the wrong word in "That Was Me" reminded me there's a topic buried somewhere in the archives here all about mis-hearing words in various songs.  I don't know exactly which section it's in...

Yes, Penny Lane has many good British references for me to enjoy. heartheart

I did think about "meeting a man from the motor trade" from SLH. Would that be a car salesman or a mechanic? or either? or something else?

Isn't the common word for umbrella used in Britland brollies?

I'll let you folks on that side of pond hash out the Liverpuddlian v Upper Class accent smackdown. a-hard-days-night-john-3

 

8 September 2013
12.02pm
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robert
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In response to this question - Wonder why they used raincoats instead of macs in "Two of Us"? And there's a raincoat in "Another Day". These are Paul McCartney songs where Linda is the main focus of each song - Linda is an American so I'd think Paul used the more American "raincoat" because that's Linda would have called a mac.

Just a thought

 

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8 September 2013
1.40pm
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I Me Mine
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8 September 2013
6.07pm
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fabfouremily said

They don't sound Upper class to my ears at all. Maybe that just depends on you, and how you compare the way you speak/sound to how they did. Don't most Americans think British people all sound posh or upper-class when talking anyway? I can understand why, it's because you're comparing that British person's accent to your own. Obviously, though, to a native British person, every accent sounds different.

I know what you mean, Americans may have that tendency.  However, surely this amusing interlude in Uncle Albert is richly upper class sounding, no?

EDIT: I could not get my TubeChop to start on the point I wanted in "Uncle Albert".  I was trying to reference that part where Paul goes:

We're so sorry, Uncle Albert,

but we haven't done a bloody thing all day...

We're so sorry, Uncle Albert,

but the kettle's on the boil, and we're so eas'ly called away...

Also, if you have access to itunes, do a search for "rich little politics and popcorn" and have a listen to "Spy Story" -- Rich Little is an American impressionist and that little track is him doing a hilarious impersonation of famous British actors from the old days (like Trevor Howard, Rex Harrison and Michael Redgrave).

 

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8 September 2013
8.24pm
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mccartneyalarm said
What about the "loo"? Shouldn't it have been "She Came in Through the Loo Window?" And in "Walrus", why was it "pretty little policemen in a row?" Why not "bobbies?" Just wonderin" (giggle)

been "She Came In Through The Bathroom Window" requires two syllables.  However, it would have been funny if he'd sung:  "She Came in Through the Loo-Loo Window" blue-meanie

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8 September 2013
8.33pm
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Ahhh Girl
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Funny Paper said

mccartneyalarm said
What about the "loo"? Shouldn't it have been "She Came in Through the Loo Window?" And in "Walrus", why was it "pretty little policemen in a row?" Why not "bobbies?" Just wonderin" (giggle)

been "She Came In Through The Bathroom Window" requires two syllables.  However, it would have been funny if he'd sung:  "She Came in Through the Loo-Loo Window" blue-meanie

Perhaps it could have been "She came in through my loo window" if they really wanted to use loo instead of bathroom?

8 September 2013
10.57pm
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Funny Paper
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cbatcu said

Funny Paper said

mccartneyalarm said
What about the "loo"? Shouldn't it have been "She Came in Through the Loo Window?" And in "Walrus", why was it "pretty little policemen in a row?" Why not "bobbies?" Just wonderin" (giggle)

been "She Came In Through The Bathroom Window" requires two syllables.  However, it would have been funny if he'd sung:  "She Came in Through the Loo-Loo Window" blue-meanie

Perhaps it could have been "She came in through my loo window" if they really wanted to use loo instead of bathroom?

You still have one syllable missing -- but that could be solved by adding one word:

She came in through my back loo window...

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8 September 2013
11.29pm
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Funny Paper said

cbatcu said

Funny Paper said

mccartneyalarm said
What about the "loo"? Shouldn't it have been "She Came in Through the Loo Window?" And in "Walrus", why was it "pretty little policemen in a row?" Why not "bobbies?" Just wonderin" (giggle)

been "She Came In Through The Bathroom Window" requires two syllables.  However, it would have been funny if he'd sung:  "She Came in Through the Loo-Loo Window" blue-meanie

Perhaps it could have been "She came in through my loo window" if they really wanted to use loo instead of bathroom?

You still have one syllable missing -- but that could be solved by adding one word:

She came in through my back loo window...

I had thought about that missing syllable. I like your fix better than what I thought of. At first, I thought they could just stretch the "my" out for 2 syllables. Your fix is much better. Yikes, I've started us rewriting Beatles songs. This might be very dangerous territory.

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