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George's Creepy Songs While With The Beatles
27 December 2012
11.38pm
Linde
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I don't think his songs are creepy, except for Blue Jay Way, that one is one I don't like to listen to when I'm by myself outside in the dark or even in a dark room, lol.

1 January 2013
11.58pm
Egroeg Evoli
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Blue Jay Way is creepy, and so is the last part of Long, Long, Long. I've never heard Only A Northern Song... still waiting to find out if my dad's old record player works so I can listen to the Yellow Submarine record I have.

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2 January 2013
12.17am
Ben Ramon
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Egroeg Evoli said
Blue Jay Way is creepy, and so is the last part of Long, Long, Long. I've never heard Only A Northern Song... still waiting to find out if my dad's old record player works so I can listen to the Yellow Submarine record I have.

You're more patient than me, I would have YouTubed it long ago.

I don't really find Only A Northern Song creepy but I'm not at all fond of it. It aims for a noisy psychedelic fanfare feel in the vein of Syd Barrett's stuff with Pink Floyd, but instead it just sounds like an aimless, overdone mess. And part of the melody is exactly the same as that of If I Needed Someone.

It's All Too Much is definitely the superior George contribution from the Yellow Submarine record, and is extremely underrated. In the year of 1967 and particularly on Sgt Pepper the Beatles didn't really "rock out" very much, and I'd describe their music of the period as psychedelic pop rather than psychedelic rock; but It's All Too Much does driving, heady psychedelic rock in a way slightly different from that on Revolver, a way that they never really did again.

SHUT UP - Paulie's talkin'
9 January 2013
3.54am
kato1964
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I remember walking home from a girlfriend's place, many, many years back. I had a couple of "refreshments" in my belly, and had enjoyed some of "Mother Nature's Heady Goodness". I was listening to "The Magical Mystery Tour" on my Walkman. (remember, I said it was many, many years back...) As I was walking along the batteries on my Walkman started to give up the ghost. However I continued to listen to the tape as I strolled along. By the time "Blue Jay Way" came on the batteries were on their last legs. The tape was running so slow at that point, that the song was the freakiest thing I'd ever heard, and I never thought of it as a really upbeat song to begin with. By the time I got home I was completely freaked out. I didn't listen to that song for a long time afterward. I still don't enjoy it all that much, and it has been at least 30 years.

9 January 2013
7.24am
Dark_Horse
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kato1964 said
I remember walking home from a girlfriend's place, many, many years back. I had a couple of "refreshments" in my belly, and had enjoyed some of "Mother Nature's Heady Goodness". I was listening to "The Magical Mystery Tour" on my Walkman. (remember, I said it was many, many years back...) As I was walking along the batteries on my Walkman started to give up the ghost. However I continued to listen to the tape as I strolled along. By the time "Blue Jay Way" came on the batteries were on their last legs. The tape was running so slow at that point, that the song was the freakiest thing I'd ever heard, and I never thought of it as a really upbeat song to begin with. By the time I got home I was completely freaked out. I didn't listen to that song for a long time afterward. I still don't enjoy it all that much, and it has been at least 30 years.

 

Classic!

All the world is birthday cake, so take a piece, but not too much. - George Harrison
9 January 2013
10.10pm
Into the Sky with Diamonds
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I don't think of Harrison's songs as creepy.

Having said that, he does do a lot of complaining and preaching, and to my ear his voice can be thin and /or lugubrious (the perfect complement to the Lennon and McCartney timbres).

In two of his three most famous Beatle songs ("Something" and "Here Comes The Sun"), he opted out of the preachy/complaining mode to great effect, and the third one ("While My Guitar GW) was considerably lightened and enhanced by the production (harmony, piano, Clapton...)

 

"Into the Sky with Diamonds" (the Beatles and the Race to the Moon – a history)
9 January 2013
10.39pm
Funny Paper
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Into the Sky with Diamonds said
I don't think of Harrison's songs as creepy.

Having said that, he does do a lot of complaining and preaching, and to my ear his voice can be thin and /or lugubrious (the perfect complement to the Lennon and McCartney timbres).

In two of his three most famous Beatle songs ("Something" and "Here Comes The Sun"), he opted out of the preachy/complaining mode to great effect, and the third one ("While My Guitar GW) was considerably lightened and enhanced by the production (harmony, piano, Clapton...)

 

He also seemed rather arrogant about his spirituality.  He had the cheek to say that John didn't really understand or fully grasp the profundity of his own lyrics in "Tomorrow Never Knows" -- and George was saying that as though he, George, of course was above that kind of ignorance; you see, George had been to the mountain-top of his Indian swamis and had learned the Real Truth about reality, unlike the rest of us peasants (including John).

 

 

Faded flowers, wait in a jar, till the evening is complete... complete... complete... complete...
9 January 2013
11.48pm
Inner Light
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Funny Paper said

Into the Sky with Diamonds said
I don't think of Harrison's songs as creepy.

Having said that, he does do a lot of complaining and preaching, and to my ear his voice can be thin and /or lugubrious (the perfect complement to the Lennon and McCartney timbres).

In two of his three most famous Beatle songs ("Something" and "Here Comes The Sun"), he opted out of the preachy/complaining mode to great effect, and the third one ("While My Guitar GW) was considerably lightened and enhanced by the production (harmony, piano, Clapton...)

 

He also seemed rather arrogant about his spirituality.  He had the cheek to say that John didn't really understand or fully grasp the profundity of his own lyrics in "Tomorrow Never Knows" -- and George was saying that as though he, George, of course was above that kind of ignorance; you see, George had been to the mountain-top of his Indian swamis and had learned the Real Truth about reality, unlike the rest of us peasants (including John).

 

George was never arrogant about his walk with God. He stood fast and kept his belief until the day he died. He expressed in his songs how he felt and wanted to share that with everyone. He had always said that he wanted his songs to mean something years from now and I believe he has achieved that. In general he wrote very profound lyrics that made you think about your own life and what was really important. He once said 'everything else can wait but the search for God cannot wait'  

 

The further one travels, the less one knows
10 January 2013
9.01am
Gerard
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Funny that the riff in "It's All Too Much" reminds me of Michael Jackson's "Black and White". They sound way too similar.

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11 January 2013
8.01am
bewareofchairs
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Funny Paper said

Into the Sky with Diamonds said
I don't think of Harrison's songs as creepy.

Having said that, he does do a lot of complaining and preaching, and to my ear his voice can be thin and /or lugubrious (the perfect complement to the Lennon and McCartney timbres).

In two of his three most famous Beatle songs ("Something" and "Here Comes The Sun"), he opted out of the preachy/complaining mode to great effect, and the third one ("While My Guitar GW) was considerably lightened and enhanced by the production (harmony, piano, Clapton...)

 

He also seemed rather arrogant about his spirituality.  He had the cheek to say that John didn't really understand or fully grasp the profundity of his own lyrics in "Tomorrow Never Knows" -- and George was saying that as though he, George, of course was above that kind of ignorance; you see, George had been to the mountain-top of his Indian swamis and had learned the Real Truth about reality, unlike the rest of us peasants (including John).

 

 

I disagree about WMGGW being enhanced by the production. The Anthology version is way better, and I think Clapton's contribution took away from the song. I can see why he could seem arrogant, but I don't think he was. He said several times that he didn't believe he was truly spiritual because he still took drugs, drank, etc., and according to Olivia always described himself as a sinner rather than some holier-than-thou guru. 

One thing I liked about George is I really do believe he sincerely wanted to help people by writing 'preachy' songs, and probably partly did it to remind himself of what he'd learned and try to improve himself.

11 January 2013
9.15am
Funny Paper
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Well, if by George's own admission he was flawed, then why can't he have the flaw of occasional arrogance?  I still think it was presumptuous of him to deem John ignorant of the "true meaning" of his own lyrics.

 

Faded flowers, wait in a jar, till the evening is complete... complete... complete... complete...
11 January 2013
10.33am
bewareofchairs
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Funny Paper said
Well, if by George's own admission he was flawed, then why can't he have the flaw of occasional arrogance?  I still think it was presumptuous of him to deem John ignorant of the "true meaning" of his own lyrics.

 

Haha, good point. I agree it was presumptuous of him, and I'm sure he was arrogant at times. I just don't think he was generally speaking, especially when he got older and took it down a notch.

11 January 2013
4.34pm
Inner Light
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bewareofchairs said

Funny Paper said

Into the Sky with Diamonds said
I don't think of Harrison's songs as creepy.

Having said that, he does do a lot of complaining and preaching, and to my ear his voice can be thin and /or lugubrious (the perfect complement to the Lennon and McCartney timbres).

In two of his three most famous Beatle songs ("Something" and "Here Comes The Sun"), he opted out of the preachy/complaining mode to great effect, and the third one ("While My Guitar GW) was considerably lightened and enhanced by the production (harmony, piano, Clapton...)

 

He also seemed rather arrogant about his spirituality.  He had the cheek to say that John didn't really understand or fully grasp the profundity of his own lyrics in "Tomorrow Never Knows" -- and George was saying that as though he, George, of course was above that kind of ignorance; you see, George had been to the mountain-top of his Indian swamis and had learned the Real Truth about reality, unlike the rest of us peasants (including John).

 

 

I disagree about WMGGW being enhanced by the production. The Anthology version is way better, and I think Clapton's contribution took away from the song. I can see why he could seem arrogant, but I don't think he was. He said several times that he didn't believe he was truly spiritual because he still took drugs, drank, etc., and according to Olivia always described himself as a sinner rather than some holier-than-thou guru. 

One thing I liked about George is I really do believe he sincerely wanted to help people by writing 'preachy' songs, and probably partly did it to remind himself of what he'd learned and try to improve himself.

The actual phrase that Olivia used was, 'He Never Said He Was A Saint But He Did Say He Was A Sinner'

I agree with you. He may have come across being preachy but that never was his intention. He did love God and wanted to share that with everyone. He just had some stumbling blocks along the way.

The further one travels, the less one knows
11 January 2013
5.08pm
bikelock28
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You know what I think's creepy? From PPM to Sgt Pepper, George sings in a lovely, lazy Liverpudlian drawl; even in the spiritual wisom of Love To You and Within You Without You, you can still hear his elongated vowels and the flatness (as in tone, not pitch) of his voice- but suddenly in The White Album, his voice is all different. George's voice The White Album through to Let It Be sounds higher-pitched and more singy, haunting and operatic, and his accent is less obvious.

I love both of the singing styles so I don't think its a bad thing at all- just a bit unexpected. Does anyone else agree? Or is it just me?

"I don't think we were actually swimming, as it were, with shirts on, 'cos we always wear overcoats when we're swimming,"-

George Harrison, Australia, June 1964

11 January 2013
8.25pm
fabfouremily
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bikelock28 said
You know what I think's creepy? From PPM to Sgt Pepper, George sings in a lovely, lazy Liverpudlian drawl; even in the spiritual wisom of Love To You and Within You Without You, you can still hear his elongated vowels and the flatness (as in tone, not pitch) of his voice- but suddenly in The White Album, his voice is all different. George's voice The White Album through to Let It Be sounds higher-pitched and more singy, haunting and operatic, and his accent is less obvious.

I love both of the singing styles so I don't think its a bad thing at all- just a bit unexpected. Does anyone else agree? Or is it just me?

I completely agree. In fact, when I first started to like The Beatles, I wasn´t aware it was the same person singing. It´s like suddenly his lyrics meant more to him (possibly?) and so he sings it differently. Maybe it´s just ´cause he was older though and having lived away from Liverpool for a few years his accent was less noticeable - plus they weren´t putting them on anymore to draw attention to themselves like in the early days.

 

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12 January 2013
12.07am
parlance
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bikelock28 said
I love both of the singing styles so I don't think its a bad thing at all- just a bit unexpected. Does anyone else agree? Or is it just me?

On a related note, it's still kind of hard to believe the same person who sang "All Things Must Pass" also did "I've Got My Mind Set on You." Almost sounds like a different voice entirely.

parlance

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12 January 2013
1.03am
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Funny Paper said
Well, if by George's own admission he was flawed, then why can't he have the flaw of occasional arrogance?  I still think it was presumptuous of him to deem John ignorant of the "true meaning" of his own lyrics.

 

Where did he say that? In some interview or...?

Living is easy with eyes closed, misunderstanding all you see.
12 January 2013
2.09am
bewareofchairs
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Inner Light said

bewareofchairs said

Funny Paper said

Into the Sky with Diamonds said
I don't think of Harrison's songs as creepy.

Having said that, he does do a lot of complaining and preaching, and to my ear his voice can be thin and /or lugubrious (the perfect complement to the Lennon and McCartney timbres).

In two of his three most famous Beatle songs ("Something" and "Here Comes The Sun"), he opted out of the preachy/complaining mode to great effect, and the third one ("While My Guitar GW) was considerably lightened and enhanced by the production (harmony, piano, Clapton...)

 

He also seemed rather arrogant about his spirituality.  He had the cheek to say that John didn't really understand or fully grasp the profundity of his own lyrics in "Tomorrow Never Knows" -- and George was saying that as though he, George, of course was above that kind of ignorance; you see, George had been to the mountain-top of his Indian swamis and had learned the Real Truth about reality, unlike the rest of us peasants (including John).

 

 

I disagree about WMGGW being enhanced by the production. The Anthology version is way better, and I think Clapton's contribution took away from the song. I can see why he could seem arrogant, but I don't think he was. He said several times that he didn't believe he was truly spiritual because he still took drugs, drank, etc., and according to Olivia always described himself as a sinner rather than some holier-than-thou guru. 

One thing I liked about George is I really do believe he sincerely wanted to help people by writing 'preachy' songs, and probably partly did it to remind himself of what he'd learned and try to improve himself.

The actual phrase that Olivia used was, 'He Never Said He Was A Saint But He Did Say He Was A Sinner'

I agree with you. He may have come across being preachy but that never was his intention. He did love God and wanted to share that with everyone. He just had some stumbling blocks along the way.

Ah, cheers. 

Yeah exactly. His heart was in the right place, and clearly it did end up helping a lot of people, including myself.

I always thought that was weird about his voice too. I guess it was some combination of becoming a better singer and his voice maturing, and maybe Paul gave him some pointers.

12 January 2013
3.58pm
Ron Nasty
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Here's a theory. Maybe we've had it wrong all these years. Maybe it shouldn't have been "Paul is Dead", but George! Maybe George was replaced by Billy Shears, and that explains the change in his voice!

"I only said we were bigger than Rod... and now there's all this!" Ron Nasty
5 March 2013
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BBCSessions1963
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George's "creepy" Beatles songs for me include Blue Jay Way, an that last part of Long Long Long. Still both some of my favorite George composistions.

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