Beatles books you own | Page 14 | Beatles books | Fab forum

Please consider registering
Guest

Log In Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —

  

— Match —

   

— Forum Options —

   

Wildcard usage:
*  matches any number of characters    %  matches exactly one character

Minimum search word length is 4 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

Beatles books you own
6 December 2013
7.55pm
Into the Sky with Diamonds
New York
Apple rooftop
Forum Posts: 1258
Member Since:
10 August 2011
Offline
261

AppleScruffJunior said, "I have never read about somebody so anti-Yoko."

I think Bramwell's 'anti-Yoko' stand is fully justified considering what he personally witnessed.

For example, on Page 305 he does say, "I don't know how she snowed him [Lennon] so totally" but he then goes on to say, "Yoko demanded service like we were her own personal servants."

So really can't blame the guy.

The cover of the book is perplexing: there are 'vintage' pictures of John, George and Ringo along with a clearly more recent picture of Paul. Couldn't find a picture of Paul from the same era? DrBeatle, you should ask Bramwell about that!

"Into the Sky with Diamonds" (the Beatles and the Race to the Moon – a history)
6 December 2013
11.02pm
IveJustSeenAFaceo
Somewhere other than where you are.
Apple rooftop
Forum Posts: 2616
Member Since:
1 November 2013
Offline
262

I actually own next to none Beatles books, I just get them from the library. The only one I own is the Yellow Submarine picture book/novelisation.

One I got from the library that I thoroughly enjoyed was Here, There, and Everywhere by Geoff Emerick. I thought it was great. I'm sure you've all read it, but I've read some not so good reviews, and I just wanted to say I really liked it. I also like the Top 100 book written by Michael Lewis and Spignessi (?), I think. Can't remember the name.   

(This signature brought to you by Winter. Coming for an abnormally long amount of time.)
16 December 2013
12.30pm
Gerrit
Netherlands
St Peters Church
Forum Posts: 14
Member Since:
19 November 2013
Offline
263

The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions, Mark Lewisohn 

The Complete Beatles Chronicle, Mark Lewisohn

Revolution In The Head – The Beatles Records And The Sixties, Ian MacDonald

A Day In The Life – The Music And Artistry Of The Beatles, Mark Hertsgaard

The Walrus Was Paul – The Great Beatle Death Clues, R. Gary Patterson 

Anthology, The Beatles

Mojo: The Beatles – Ten Years That Shook The World

The Mammoth Book Of The Beatles

All These Years – Tune In Extended Edition, Mark Lewisohn

In His Own Write & A Spaniard In The Works, John Lennon

Lennon Remembers, Jann S. Wenner

Last Interview – All We Are Saying – John Lennon & Yoko Ono, David Sheff

Lennon – The Definitive Biography, Ray Coleman 

John Lennon, Philip Norman

Lennon, Tim Riley

Paul McCartey – Many Years From Now, Barry Miles

FAB: The Life Of Paul McCartney, Howard Sounes

"Life is just a bowl of All-Brann. You wake up every morning and it's there."

16 December 2013
7.14pm
Bungalow Bob
Seattle, Washington
Hollywood Bowl
Forum Posts: 353
Member Since:
16 September 2013
Offline
264

I am now reading the fairly new Beatles' book "All The Songs." I was the first person to check it out from my local library, and it is full of fun new facts. For instance, Johnnie Scott, the flute player on "You've Got To Hide Your Love Away," was paid the ridiculous sum of £6 ($9 US) for his session work! And the string players on "Eleanor Rigby" were paid £5 (7.50 US)!!! And then, according to Geoff Emerick, while recording "Yellow Submarine," they resorted to using existing sound effects records for the brass band, saving the expense of hiring brass session musicians! I realize that £5 and £6 pounds must have been the going rate back then in the sixties, but it still strikes me as funny that the Abbey Road people would be involved in making such classic music, and still be concerned about "chump change" like that. (I hope the highly skilled session players at least got their parking validated while working at the studio.) ;-)

17 December 2013
7.24pm
Linde
The Netherlands
Apple rooftop
Forum Posts: 1911
Member Since:
21 November 2012
Offline
265

I know how back in the day things were cheaper. I know, my grandma always tells me an ice cream used to be a few cents, and now it's a few euro's. But 6 pounds for session work sounds ridiculous!

17 December 2013
7.36pm
fabfouremily
Sitting in an English garden
Apple rooftop
Forum Posts: 2926
Member Since:
3 May 2012
Offline
266

Thinking back to before all the inflation in the past 40, 50 years, 6 pounds for session work sounds okay. These guys weren't part of a succesful band, though there are many that later became famous in the industry (Page is just one I can think of off the top of my head) – they were ''just'' people who knew how to play an instrument. Or was/is their wage considered low to everyone else?

''We're just knocked out. We heard about the sell out. You gotta get an album out, you owe it to the people. We're so happy we can hardly count.''

17 December 2013
7.57pm
meanmistermustard
Moderator



Forum Posts: 9238
Member Since:
1 May 2011
Offline
267

Using an inflation calculator site (admittedly using date for 2012), £6 in 1965 would be equivalent to £98.35 last year. Not too bad for a few hours work.

"Well, probably we'll sell less records, less people'll go to see the film, we'll write less songs, and we'll all die of failure" (John Lennon 8/64)
17 December 2013
7.59pm
Ron Nasty
"Where have you been?" "I'm not telling you..."
Apple rooftop
Forum Posts: 2940
Member Since:
17 December 2012
Offline
268

Lewisohn has a pound in 1962 worth around £18.45 today in Tune In. Though obviously as these dates are later the '60s, the sum would vary one way or the other. It would their session musicians were getting, in today's money, around about £100 for a session, which would usually be around three hours. Another comparison that can be made, the average weekly wage in 1964 (closest I could find) was £14, so nearly half the average weekly wage for a few hours work doesn't seem unreasonable.

"I only said we were bigger than Rod... and now there's all this!" Ron Nasty
18 December 2013
4.30pm
Bungalow Bob
Seattle, Washington
Hollywood Bowl
Forum Posts: 353
Member Since:
16 September 2013
Offline
269

mja6758 said
Lewisohn has a pound in 1962 worth around £18.45 today…

In an attempt to understand this rate of inflation, I went down to Penny Lane, and grabbed a seat next to the banker at the barber shop. While he was waiting for a trim, I gave him Lewisohn's figures, and he began crunching the numbers. According to an adjusted rate of 18.45, Mean Mister Mustard in 2013 would have to stuff 184.5 bob up his nose. The singer in "Maggie Mae" would now be looking at a take-home pay of around £40. Then, before the banker could explain further, we got interrupted by the fireman, who rushed in from the pouring rain. Yeah, as you can imagine… it was very strange.

18 December 2013
4.31pm
DrBeatle
Boston
Apple rooftop
Forum Posts: 1387
Member Since:
29 November 2012
Offline
270

mja6758 said
Lewisohn has a pound in 1962 worth around £18.45 today in Tune In. Though obviously as these dates are later the '60s, the sum would vary one way or the other. It would their session musicians were getting, in today's money, around about £100 for a session, which would usually be around three hours. Another comparison that can be made, the average weekly wage in 1964 (closest I could find) was £14, so nearly half the average weekly wage for a few hours work doesn't seem unreasonable.

Out of curiosity, was the pound valued differently in the pre-decimal (ie pre-1971) era? Or was the difference simply how it was split up?

 

"I know you, you know me; one thing I can tell you is you got to be free!"

 

Please Visit My Website, The Rock and Roll Chemist

Twitter: @blackbookblur

 

18 December 2013
6.10pm
Ahhh Girl
sailing on a winedark open sea
Moderator


Forum Posts: 4462
Member Since:
20 August 2013
Offline
271

Bungalow Bob said

mja6758 said
Lewisohn has a pound in 1962 worth around £18.45 today…

In an attempt to understand this rate of inflation, I went down to Penny Lane, and grabbed a seat next to the banker at the barber shop. While he was waiting for a trim, I gave him Lewisohn's figures, and he began crunching the numbers. According to an adjusted rate of 18.45, Mean Mister Mustard in 2013 would have to stuff 184.5 bob up his nose. The singer in "Maggie Mae" would now be looking at a take-home pay of around £40. Then, before the banker could explain further, we got interrupted by the fireman, who rushed in from the pouring rain. Yeah, as you can imagine… it was very strange.

You made me :-)

Still, money can't buy you love -- or fun. No matter the inflation rate.

 

19 December 2013
12.46pm
Joe
Pepperland
Admin
Forum Posts: 3404
Member Since:
31 March 2008
Offline
272

If the singer of Maggie Mae was taking home £40 a week, I'd have thought that was would barely cover the cost of her 'services', let alone food, heating, shelter… The average today is around £450.

Please don't spoil my day; I'm miles away

Can buy me love! Please consider using these links to support the Beatles Bible: Amazon | iTunes

19 December 2013
4.16pm
Bungalow Bob
Seattle, Washington
Hollywood Bowl
Forum Posts: 353
Member Since:
16 September 2013
Offline
273

Joe said
If the singer of Maggie Mae was taking home £40 a week, I'd have thought that was would barely cover the cost of her 'services', let alone food, heating, shelter… The average today is around £450.

The banker, perhaps distracted by the soaking-wet fireman, made an erroneous assumption. He heard that the "Maggie Mae" narrator boasted a take-home pay of 2-pound-ten, and multiplied that by the inflation rate of 18.75… not taking into account when all the action was taking place on Liverpool's Lime Street. It could have been as early as 1830, or possibly the 1950s, but the banker mistakenly based his calculations on the year 1962. After he left the barbershop, the fireman pointed out that the foolish banker doesn't even wear a mac in the pouring rain. The barber then mumbled "No wonder little children laugh at him behind his back."

In an attempt to steer this thread back to its subject, here's what I read last night in the Beatles' book "All The Songs:" As "Bungalow Bill" fades out and segues into "While My Guitar Gently Weeps," it is John Lennon that shouts "Ey up!" in his best Scouse accent. "Ey up" means "What's up?" I always thought that it was George that shouted that. Non-Beatle fans will smack their heads and exclaim "Why is that important!?!" Well… It just is.

19 December 2013
4.56pm
meanmistermustard
Moderator



Forum Posts: 9238
Member Since:
1 May 2011
Offline
274

Bungalow Bob said

Joe said
If the singer of Maggie Mae was taking home £40 a week, I'd have thought that was would barely cover the cost of her 'services', let alone food, heating, shelter… The average today is around £450.

The banker, perhaps distracted by the soaking-wet fireman, made an erroneous assumption. He heard that the "Maggie Mae" narrator boasted a take-home pay of 2-pound-ten, and multiplied that by the inflation rate of 18.75… not taking into account when all the action was taking place on Liverpool's Lime Street. It could have been as early as 1830, or possibly the 1950s, but the banker mistakenly based his calculations on the year 1962. After he left the barbershop, the fireman pointed out that the foolish banker doesn't even wear a mac in the pouring rain. The barber then mumbled "No wonder little children laugh at him behind his back."

In an attempt to steer this thread back to its subject, here's what I read last night in the Beatles' book "All The Songs:" As "Bungalow Bill" fades out and segues into "While My Guitar Gently Weeps," it is John Lennon that shouts "Ey up!" in his best Scouse accent. "Ey up" means "What's up?" I always thought that it was George that shouted that. Non-Beatle fans will smack their heads and exclaim "Why is that important!?!" Well… It just is.

I've always taken John was meaning it as a kind of look out (i picture it in my head as a Yorkshire man would say "ey up" to another person when someone was coming down the road and they wanted him/her to gather their wits – am i making sense? surely someone can explain what i mean better – talk about rambling gibberish.); considering the quietness of the Bungalow Bill ending, a way of getting the listeners attention to whats next. Its a brilliant way of linking the two songs as neither Bungalow Bill  or WMGGW are as good without John's call.

"Ey up" can mean a number of things, wiktionary lists a few as as 

(dialectal) Hello
(dialectal) How are you?
(dialectal) Look at that!, take notice of that!
(dialectal) Don't do that; a warning.
(dialectal) What is that?

"Well, probably we'll sell less records, less people'll go to see the film, we'll write less songs, and we'll all die of failure" (John Lennon 8/64)
19 December 2013
9.10pm
fabfouremily
Sitting in an English garden
Apple rooftop
Forum Posts: 2926
Member Since:
3 May 2012
Offline
275

^ Yeah, that's what I assumed it meant. Like, I dunno, ''pay attention'' or something similar. I'm no good at explaining things like this.

''We're just knocked out. We heard about the sell out. You gotta get an album out, you owe it to the people. We're so happy we can hardly count.''

4 January 2014
8.21pm
ScrambledEggs
Behind the moon
Carnegie Hall
Forum Posts: 284
Member Since:
16 December 2013
Offline
276

Yes, I know it isn't a book, but I am so happy to have finally found something! My sister bought the Rolling Stone's Collectors Edition, Paul McCartney for me today. It was a belated New Year's gift and cost a fortune over here (can't help but feel a bit guilty). I read it in one breath.

Hopefully I will come back to this thread to write about some book I bought one day.

 

4 January 2014
9.09pm
IveJustSeenAFaceo
Somewhere other than where you are.
Apple rooftop
Forum Posts: 2616
Member Since:
1 November 2013
Offline
277

I got a few for Christmas, so now I have The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions, The Bob Spitz biography, You Never Give Me Your Money, and a rather uninformative book from the dollar store, simply titled "The Beatles" and no author on the front cover. It has nice pictures though.

(This signature brought to you by Winter. Coming for an abnormally long amount of time.)
5 January 2014
5.10am
trcanberra
Canberra, ACT
Apple rooftop
Forum Posts: 1626
Member Since:
29 August 2013
Offline
278

The 'Story of Pop' version of The Beatles Story – only 60p and an all-time classic :)

20 January 2014
2.05am
trcanberra
Canberra, ACT
Apple rooftop
Forum Posts: 1626
Member Since:
29 August 2013
Offline
279

My brother visited over Christmas and brought down a couple of boxes of my old junk that had been at my mother's place since around 1990.  I just got around to seeing what is in them.  Among them I found some quirky paperbacks that I totally forgot I ever had:

1)  The John Lennon Story by John Swenson, 1981

2)  The Longest Cocktail Party by Richard DiLello, 1974

3)  The Lennon Tapes by Andy Peebles, 1981

4)  The Beatles in Help by Al Hine, 1965.  This is a novelisation – I can't think of many film novelisations which would be less exciting than this one :)

From their condition it looks like I had scoured one of the local 2nd-hand bookshops in around 1982.  The Help book cost me 20c – maybe that was a week's pay back then??

20 January 2014
2.08am
Ahhh Girl
sailing on a winedark open sea
Moderator


Forum Posts: 4462
Member Since:
20 August 2013
Offline
280

trcanberra said
My brother visited over Christmas and brought down a couple of boxes of my old junk that had been at my mother's place since around 1990.  I just got around to seeing what is in them.  Among them I found some quirky paperbacks that I totally forgot I ever had:

1)  The John Lennon Story by John Swenson, 1981

2)  The Longest Cocktail Party by Richard DiLello, 1974

3)  The Lennon Tapes by Andy Peebles, 1981

4)  The Beatles in Help by Al Hine, 1965.  This is a novelisation – I can't think of many film novelisations which would be less exciting than this one :)

From their condition it looks like I had scoured one of the local 2nd-hand bookshops in around 1982.  The Help book cost me 20c – maybe that was a week's pay back then??

So, are the covers in good enough condition for ya? ahdn_paul_02a-hard-days-night-george-10

 

Forum Timezone: Europe/London

Most Users Ever Online: 597

Currently Online: Zig, Inner Light, Beatleva, Mimi, thisbirdhasflown, Filipe
67 Guest(s)

Currently Browsing this Page:
2 Guest(s)

Top Posters:

meanmistermustard: 9238

mr. Sun king coming together: 6916

parlance: 4895

mithveaen: 4651

Ahhh Girl: 4462

Zig: 3633

Annadog40: 3532

Mr. Kite: 3176

Ron Nasty: 2940

fabfouremily: 2926

Member Stats:

Guest Posters: 87

Members: 2498

Moderators: 4

Admins: 2

Forum Stats:

Groups: 3

Forums: 34

Topics: 3184

Posts: 128768

Newest Members: S. L. Martin, DianaDavis, tangerinetrees99, GeorgeLuvr, PauliesGirl

Moderators: Ahhh Girl (4462), meanmistermustard (9238), Zig (3633), Joe (3404)

Administrators: Joe (3404), Ellie (1)

Members Birthdays
Today: None
Upcoming: None