1969

George Harrison live at Colston Hall, Bristol with Delaney & Bonnie

On 1 December 1969 George Harrison watched husband and wife act Delaney and Bonnie Bramlett perform at the Albert Hall in London. The following night he joined them on stage in Bristol, for his first stage appearance since The Beatles’ final concert on 29 August 1966.

Mixing: Lady Madonna, Rain, Octopus’s Garden

Studio Two (control room), EMI Studios, Abbey Road Producer: George Martin Engineer: Geoff Emerick In preparation for the release of the US compilation Hey Jude, stereo mixes of two of the songs were prepared on this day.

Mixing: Stardust, Dream by Ringo Starr

Room 4, EMI Studios, Abbey Road Producer: George Martin Engineer: Geoff Emerick Rough stereo mixes of two songs recorded for Ringo Starr‘s debut studio album, Sentimental Journey, were made on this day.

Recording: Stardust, Dream by Ringo Starr

Trident Studios, London Producer: George Martin The fourth recording session for Ringo Starr‘s debut studio album, Sentimental Journey, took place on this day.

Recording: Stardust by Ringo Starr

Wessex Sound Studios, Highbury New Park, London Producer: George Martin The third recording session for Ringo Starr‘s debut studio album, Sentimental Journey, took place on this day.

Recording: Stormy Weather by Ringo Starr

Wessex Sound Studios, Highbury New Park, London Producer: George Martin The second recording session for Ringo Starr‘s debut studio album, Sentimental Journey, took place on this day. He taped the song Stormy Weather with George Martin producing.

UK single release: Something/Come Together

In the United Kingdom, The Beatles had never previously issued songs after they had been made available on an album. All singles were either standalone releases, or came out on the same day as the parent album.

Recording, mixing: Night And Day by Ringo Starr

Studio Three, EMI Studios, Abbey Road Producer: George Martin Ringo Starr began recording his first studio album, Sentimental Journey, on this day. He recorded Night And Day in two sessions, with George Martin producing.

Paul McCartney denies reports of his death

The ‘Paul is Dead’ myth first surfaced in print in the 17 September 1969 edition of the Times-Delphic, the newspaper of the Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa. It quickly snowballed, and was heavily featured on the Detroit radio station MKNR. Towards the middle of October it had broken across the Atlantic.