July 1968

Recording: Hey Jude

Trident Studios, St Anne’s Court, London Producer: George Martin Engineer: Barry Sheffield Following two days of rehearsals and rough takes, The Beatles finally began recording Hey Jude properly.

The Apple Boutique closes down

The Beatles decided the previous day to close down their Apple Boutique in Baker Street, and announced that they would give away the stock. Members of the public queued throughout the night for a chance of getting a free item.

Recording, mixing: Hey Jude

Studio Two, EMI Studios, Abbey Road Producer: George Martin Engineer: Ken Scott This second session for Hey Jude saw the song take shape, coming after the previous day‘s first session.

Recording: Hey Jude

Studio Two, EMI Studios, Abbey Road Engineer: Ken Scott George Martin was unavailable for this session, which saw work begin on The Beatles’ next single Hey Jude.

The Mad Day Out: location seven

The final location of The Beatles’ Mad Day Out, in which hundreds of photographs were taken around London in the course of a day, was 7 Cavendish Avenue, Paul McCartney‘s house in St John’s Wood, north London.

The Mad Day Out: location six

After leaving St Pancras Old Church and Gardens, The Beatles travelled to east London to Wapping Pier Head and Wapping High Street, for the sixth location of the Mad Day Out photoshoot.

The Mad Day Out: location five

After striking numerous poses on a traffic island in Old Street, north London, The Beatles travelled to St Pancras Old Church and Gardens near Regent’s Park, where some of the best-known photographs of the Mad Day Out were taken.

The Mad Day Out: location four

The fourth location in the Mad Day Out, in which The Beatles were photographed in various places around London, was in Old Street, a busy thoroughfare in the north of the city.

The Mad Day Out: location three

After their photography session at the Mercury Theatre in Notting Hill, The Beatles’ Mad Day Out continued towards Highgate Cemetery in north London.

The Mad Day Out: location two

The second location in The Beatles’ Mad Day Out photography extravaganza took place at the Mercury Theatre at 2 Ladbroke Road in Notting Hill, London.

The Mad Day Out: location one

In the early summer of 1968, Paul McCartney telephoned esteemed war photographer Don McCullin to ask him to spend a day photographing The Beatles. The group was in need of new publicity images, and wanted to get away from the recording studio temporarily.

Recording: While My Guitar Gently Weeps

Studio Two, EMI Studios, Abbey Road Producer: George Martin Engineer: Ken Scott Although George Harrison had written a number of songs prior to and during The Beatles’ 1968 trip to India, he was yet to record any for the White Album. That changed during this session, when he recorded the first version of While My… Read more »

Recording: Sexy Sadie

Studio Two, EMI Studios, Abbey Road Producer: George Martin Engineer: Ken Scott Following an unproductive first session on 19 July 1968, The Beatles continued work on Sexy Sadie.

Recording: A Beginning, Good Night

Studio One, EMI Studios, Abbey Road Producer: George Martin Engineer: Ken Scott This session took place in Abbey Road’s largest studio, where an orchestra and choir were recorded for two White Album songs.

Recording: Sexy Sadie

Studio Two, EMI Studios, Abbey Road Producer: George Martin Engineer: Ken Scott The Beatles began recording Sexy Sadie, John Lennon‘s barbed tribute to Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, during this 7.30pm-4am session.

Recording: Cry Baby Cry, Helter Skelter

Studio Two, EMI Studios, Abbey Road Producer: George Martin Engineer: Ken Scott The Beatles completed the recording of Cry Baby Cry during this day’s two sessions, and also began work on Helter Skelter.

World première of Yellow Submarine

The world première of The Beatles’ animated feature film, Yellow Submarine, took place on this evening at the London Pavilion on Piccadilly Circus.

Recording: Cry Baby Cry

Studio Two, EMI Studios, Abbey Road Producer: George Martin Engineer: Geoff Emerick Following a six-hour rehearsal session on 15 July 1968, The Beatles began proper recordings of Cry Baby Cry on this day.